Don’t touch that phone even a little bit

Distracted driving is serious business and the RCMP are cracking down

Const. Steve Holmes reminds motorists that March is distracted driving month. (Image Credit: Kathy Michaels) Const. Steve Holmes reminds motorists that March is distracted driving month. (Image Credit: Kathy Michaels)

If you want to avoid hefty fines don’t touch your phone while driving.

Don’t hold it to use the speaker function. Don’t even move it from the seat to the dashboard.

Even the slightest contact, Const. Steve Holmes explained during a Friday press conference highlighting Distracted Driving month, could cost you.

“People need to know that according to the legislation, ‘use’ is simply when a person holds a device in their hands,” said Holmes.

“Whether they are transferring that device from one point to another or holding it up for a speaker phone; if that device is seen then the offence is complete and the person can be charged.”

Another lesser known offence is driving around with two headphones in your ears. One is considered acceptable, while the second is not. All the normal offenses stand, too. No texting, no dialling, no scrolling for music is allowed — it’s not even OK at a stop sign.

These offences come at a heavy cost. Holmes said that as of June 1, 2016 legislation changed to increase the fines from $167 to $368 and added an extra four points to the penalty as well. Repeat offenders really get hammered.

If a person has more than one ticket in a year then fines and the points will accrue and ICBC could introduce sanctions or suspensions. If you drive around with an N or an L on the back of your car, you’re looking at an instant suspension.

Despite the ban and the subsequent heftier fines, Holmes said he hasn’t seen a significant decrease in the number of people he sees driving while using their phones.

“It’s just as prevalent now as it was when the ban went into place seven years ago,” he said.

The only difference, explained Holmes, is that people have become a bit shiftier about the way they go about using their devices on the road.

He even had one motorist claim that they weren’t on the phone when police pulled them over. He had actually been talking into his coffee cup.

Needless to say, they didn’t sway the police who believe the stakes are high with distracted driving.

Christine Kirby, local ICBC road safety coordinator, explained that distracted driving is the second only to speed for the number of people it kills on BC roads each year and it’s particularly bad in Kelowna.

Of the 78 deaths attributed to distracted driving across B.C. last year, 32 were in the southern Interior.

She had no specifics on how many people were seriously injured, but there were more than 800 crashes in B.C. last year.

Just Posted

New hotel planned for Salmon Arm

Fairfield Inn & Suites Marriott to build, applying for rezoning with city

Minimal increase in city budget

Salmon Arm taxpayers to pay 1.5 per cent increase in 2018 taxes.

Traci Genereaux remembered at Vernon vigil

Family and friends remember Genereaux as a “fiery red-head with the best sense of humour”

Making the case for and against a $15 per hour minimum wage in B.C.

Fair Wages Commission hears both sides during a stop in Kelowna

Liberal leadership hopeful makes short stop

Dianne Watts to visit Salmon Arm and Vernon for one-hour meet-and-greets Wednesday

Tattooing couple opens new shop in Lake Country

Cody and Fabiana Philpott opened NSI Tattoo in August

B.C. cat torture recorded on Snapchat, sent to owner

“I can’t stop shaking,” Haglund said. “Last night was so bad my teeth were clattering.”

B.C. teacher punished after sharing inappropriate personal details with students

Nicole Monique Vieira has agreed to take a course on respecting professional boundaries

Countdown to BC Winter Games begins

Olympic athletes will be on hand to watch the torchlighting ceremony Wednesday evening in Kamloops

Auction aids in art acquisition

Online event supports Shuswap District Arts Council projects

Opioid prescriptions up across Canada: report

The report shows the number of opioid prescriptions rose by almost seven per cent, while daily doses on average dropped

Russian meddling has implications for Canada

Kosovo president Hashim Thaci warns that Russian meddling has implications for Canada

Health Canada hints at government’s plans for legal pot

Health warnings, plain covers for pot packs under proposed regulations

Washington governor tells BC don’t be ‘daunted’ by Trump

“I want to assure this assembly that no matter who is in the White House, it won’t affect Washington state’s relationship with Canada or British Columbia.”

Most Read