The Adams River Salmon Society is hosting a contest in an effort to educate area youths about the challenges and threats salmon face on their arduous voyage to the Shuswap. In this the dominant year, some 750,000 late-run sockeye are expected to return to their Adams River spawning grounds. (File photo)

The Adams River Salmon Society is hosting a contest in an effort to educate area youths about the challenges and threats salmon face on their arduous voyage to the Shuswap. In this the dominant year, some 750,000 late-run sockeye are expected to return to their Adams River spawning grounds. (File photo)

Helping salmon come home to the Shuswap

Contest for young people is designed to educate about threats and challenges fish face

Late-run sockeye salmon are on their way to the Shuswap.

They face many threats and challenges along the way and how many make it to their spawning grounds depends on their ability to survive them.

In response to ever-growing concern about the future of salmon in the province, the Adams River Salmon Society is holding a contest to educate youths about the issues.

The contest is designed to support B.C.’s new curriculum in that teachers can do projects using the essential question of “how can we help salmon come home?” with their classes.

The cumulative project would then be submitted to the contest, which will be promoted during the Salute to Sockeye Festival, which runs Sept. 28 to Oct. 21, with the final entry date being Nov. 16.

Submissions are to be made in some form of media such as art, drawing, music, video, etc.

Related: Race is on for Shuswap late-run sockeye salmon

Entries will be judged by resident experts. Judges will look for innovative ideas to answer the inquiry question “How can we help the salmon come home?” including an understanding of salmon and the different connections with ecosystems, watersheds, oceans and human impacts.

Prizes will be awarded in three categories: early primary classes kindergarten to Grade 2; elementary classes grades 3 to 5 and intermediate classes grades 6 to 8.

Individual prizes are available to winning students ages six to18.

They will include outdoor gear and entry to outdoor-related activities.

The society has received prize donations from the Kingfisher Interpretive Centre Society, Meikle Studios Social Art House, Alan Brooks Nature Centre, Quaaout Lodge, Shuswap Naturalists, and more to come.

And Fresh Books, Telus, Pacific Salmon Foundation, Askew’s and Columbia Shuswap Regional District have confirmed their support for the contest.

For more information, go to www.salmonsociety.com/events/youth-for-salmon-contest.


@SalmonArm
barb.brouwer@saobserver.net

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