Author and environmentalist Jim Cooperman thumbs through a copy of his new book, Everything Shuswap. All proceeds from book sales, which was produced in partnership with the North Okanagan-Shuswap School District, will be donated to support outdoor learning programs. Author and environmentalist Jim Cooperman thumbs through a copy of his new book, Everything Shuswap. All proceeds from book sales, which was produced in partnership with the North Okanagan-Shuswap School District, will be donated to support outdoor learning programs. - Image credit: Tracy Hughes/Salmon Arm Observer

Everything Shuswap’s success story

Book now moving into its second printing

Sales of the first book about the Shuswap region, Everything Shuswap, have exceeded expectations with the first edition nearly sold out.

It has been a hot ticket item for holiday gifts, and there could be a shortage on the shelves. Fortunately, a second printing will be available soon.

Reviews have been overwhelmingly positive, including the full-page coverage in BC Bookworld by former CBC almanac host, Mark Forsythe.

He wrote, “Jim Cooperman guides us through each watershed, pausing at key parks, valleys, old growth forests (including an interior rainforest), providing relevant historical context along the way. Early chapters on ecology and geology trace the physical landscape, while stories and profiles of indigenous peoples and settlers occupy most of the pages. There is a strong sense of place throughout.”

Everything Shuswap is more than a book; it is also an educational project. Efforts have begun to integrate the book into the high school curriculum with the aid of a teacher’s guide that is now in draft form. There is a plan for high school students to assist with the research for the next two volumes. Next spring, funds from the sales of the book will be used to help cover the costs of student outdoor field trips.

After a recent tour with book launches in Surrey and Victoria, Everything Shuswap is attracting more interest. Soon, the book will be featured in the The Tyee, with excerpts from chapter four and an interview with Cooperman.

Plans are in the works to secure a national distributor to get a presence in larger retail outlets such as BC Ferries, Mountain Equipment Co-op and other national chains.

One of the most memorable feedback comments about the book came from a local, young couple who decided to have a summer “stay-cation” using Everything Shuswap as their travel guide.

Copies are available in Salmon Arm at Askews, Bookingham Palace, DeMille’s and Hidden Gems.

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