Letter: Balmoral/Highway 1 intersection fix a dangerous fail

Writer doesn’t see recently completed reconfiguration improving situation

I’m an Eagle Bay resident, and I am furious—$3.3 million of our hard-earned money spent on improving the Balmoral-TCH (Trans-Canada Highway) intersection for through traffic, while antagonizing and further isolating the communities affected by this?

I worry for the drivers of our children’s school busses.

This change to the driving pattern is not a change we are eventually going to grow accustomed to. It’s bad. It’s going to stay bad, and we are going to stay frustrated and angry.

Worse than creating less-than-safe-access to the highway for the ever-increasing number of us in the communities who need it, I don’t see this change actually making an overall difference in the safety of the Balmoral-TCH intersection for those turning eastbound.

Visibility to the west is still restricted by the hill, the merge lane is near non-existent and the barricades add a false sense of security to through traffic; potentially making it seem OK to pick up speed and exceed the stated speed limit on the straightaway after cresting the hill.

Read more: Letter: Balmoral Road/Highway 1 intersection “improvements” don’t impress

Read more: Concerns remain for reconfigured Highway 1/Balmoral intersection

The issue with the Balmoral-TCH intersection was more a design flaw with the four-laning, coupled with an increase in speed limit, and less about bad or impatient drivers as many would intimate.

The hill to the west limited visibility, and made it extremely difficult to discern what lane fast-moving, on-coming traffic was travelling in. Add blind spots created by a lamp standard and the A-pillar of our vehicles, and you have a recipe for disaster.

Assuming traffic lights activated by sensor pads were never an option, an over or underpass for the Balmoral-TCH intersection should have been included with the original four-lane highway design.

Simple as that.

What’s not so simple now will be convincing the province that their costly band-aid fix is a dangerous fail.

Sharon Vos

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Shuswap residents, distiller respond to safety, sanitization needs at seniors care facilities

Sicamous’ After Dark Distillery shifts to making sanitizer to support community

City of Salmon Arm gives preliminary approval to plan for high-density housing

If rezoning proceeds, it could provide about 15 to 20 housing units across from Mall at Piccadilly

UPDATE: One arrest in manhunt for ‘armed’ suspects near Enderby

Residents alarmed over increased police presence Tuesday morning

COVID-19: Salmon Arm council makes tough decisions to address economic stress

Among the city’s measures are tax breaks, layoffs and a project delay

COVID-19: Diabetes Canada donation bins becoming garbage dumps amid pandemic

Diabetes Canada has asked residents to stop overflowing bins with donations and garbage

Lifestyles Coffee in Lake Country creates funny video of couple stuck in quarantine

Lifestyles Coffee is located at 10058 BC-97 unit 4, Lake Country, B.C.

VIDEO: Teachers at Kelowna middle school shoot video to show support for students

KLO teachers Kayla Rose and Tonia Macgregor were the minds behind the gesture

Easter bunny to send ambassador to Golden for weekend drive-by

The Easter bunny will be sending his emissary, Egglebert Bunny, to celebrate Easter with Golden

Logan Boulet Effect: Green Shirt Day calls on Canadians to become organ donors

While social distancing, the day also honours the 16 lives lost in the 2018 Humboldt Broncos Crash

COVID-19: Kelowna’s Grey Hearts Denim to manufacture protective masks

The Kelowna based clothing company has been in operation since mid-February

COMMENTARY: Knowing where COVID-19 cases are does not protect you

Dr. Bonnie Henry explains why B.C. withholds community names

Regional District of Okanagan Similkameen cuts two positions

Management roles cut as a result of ongoing COVID-19 pandemic

As Canadians return home amid pandemic, border crossings dip to just 5% of usual traffic

Non-commercial land crossing dipped by 95%, air travel dropped by 96 per cent, according to the CBSA

Most Read