Brent Owen, owner and head coach at Keating CrossFit, sits on a stack of weights in his gym. Photography by Don Denton/Pearl Magazine

Brent Owen, owner and head coach at Keating CrossFit, sits on a stack of weights in his gym. Photography by Don Denton/Pearl Magazine

Crossfit For Life

Exercise training for fitness and well being

  • Aug. 28, 2018 10:43 a.m.

It’s a cool evening in October — you know the kind — black skies at six o’clock and a chill that shakes you to the bone. It’s a night that makes you want to curl up under a blanket and hide out until morning. Instead, I’m dashing across the parking lot and through the front door of Keating CrossFit for the first time.

The fully loaded gym is clean and rustic, with visible signs of hard work and determination suggested through conspicuous scratches here and there.

Brent Owen, owner and head coach, welcomes me and 10 others to our inaugural session of the Keating CrossFit beginner series. The series is one month long, consists of two lessons a week, and Brent, with an assistant coach, teaches the fundamentals of the sport. Beginner series are common at all CrossFit gyms but the extent and delivery vary.

As I stand in line with my beginner comrades, I’m afraid. Brent stands before us with a cool reserve and confidence. He’s incredibly fit and speaks fluently about CrossFit, demonstrating his intimate knowledge of the sport.

Brent takes us through a typical CrossFit workout, which includes a warm-up, strength training and a “workout of the day,” better known as WoD. He is meticulous in his training. He has the eye of a hawk and, with the help of his assistant coach, manages to pay individual attention to everyone, ensuring we are doing the movements correctly.

“People come in here and think CrossFit is going to be hard. But all exercise is hard; it’s more about the effort you’re willing to put in. The difference when you come into a class like CrossFit is that you have a coach, someone like me watching you, encouraging you and expecting you to work hard,” says Brent.

Brent opened Keating CrossFit in 2014. The father of three young children describes CrossFit as a vessel for propelling change in people’s lives.

“You want to change your life when you come in here. I fell in love with being fit, feeling good and being in a good mood all the time,” Brent explains. “Once you start getting a little bit better and you see that you can do things you never thought you could do, you build a whole new confidence, which carries through to every part of your life.

It’s been about five months since that first cool night and I have succumbed to the addictive nature of CrossFit. The sport is commonly referred to as the “CrossFit Community.” There is an undercurrent of acceptance and support for everyone’s personal circumstances and fitness level.

“CrossFit is for absolutely everyone. The movements are all scalable and practical. The hardest part for anyone is walking through the front door,” notes Brent.

CrossFit is a place where people of all ages (from teens right up to seniors), fitness levels and personal conditions — from injuries to pregnancies — come together to support one another in sport and in life.

I owe credit to Brent for a few important things: first, he has effectively debunked any negative connotations I previously had about the sport; second, he is beyond tolerant of my endless string of questions, even when I am repeating myself; third, the man has whipped me into better shape than I could have ever anticipated being in my life.

CrossFit workouts are designed to be comprehensive and include high intensity interval training, Olympic weightlifting, plyometrics, powerlifting, gymnastics, calisthenics and strongman components.

The ten key physical qualities CrossFit contributes to are: cardiovascular/respiratory endurance, power, speed, coordination, stamina, strength, flexibility, agility, balance and accuracy.

Beginner Tips:

1) Find a good coach. I could never have started on this journey without the proficient instruction of Brent and the other coaches at Keating CrossFit.

2) Start slowly and respect the limits of your body. I am still the slowest and lightest lifter in every class I go to, but I know I’m working my hardest, and listening to my body (in and out of class).

3) Don’t be afraid to speak up. If something doesn’t feel right, or a movement is hurting you in any way, tell your coach; he or she can easily offer you tips or an alternative exercise.

– Story by Chelsea Forman

Story courtesy of Boulevard Magazine, a Black Press Media publication

Like Boulevard Magazine on Facebook and follow them on Instagram

CrossfitExerciseFitnessHealthHealth and wellnessLifestylePearl MagazinePhysical fitnessTrainingWorking outWorkout

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

The Canoe Forest Products plywood plant in Salmon Arm is holding its own. (File photo)
Canoe Forest Products in Salmon Arm holding its own during pandemic

General manager says pandemic has not forced layoffs, still 180 people working

COVID-19. (Image courtesy CDC)
47 new COVID-19 cases in Interior Health region

1,538 total cases, 399 are active, ten in hospital

A line of cars was left waiting for a train at the Marine Park Drive railway crossing as a train halted by a mechanical issue blocked both crossings in the area for close to an hour. (Photo Submitted)
Mechanical issues stall traffic at Salmon Arm rail crossings

Train was stopped on tracks blocking crossings at Narcisse Street and Marine Park Drive

Due to restrictions around COVID-19, access to the Larch Hills chalet will be limited for the 2020/21 cross-country ski season. (File photo)
Early snow means early cross-country skiing at Shuswap’s Larch Hills

COVID-19 requirements restrict use of chalet, postpones of events

The CP Holiday Train stops in Salmon Arm on Dec. 14, 2019. (File photo)
CP Holiday Train at Home to give $7,000 to Salmon Arm food bank

Council members express appreciation for support of the Shuswap from CP Rail

A woman wears a protective face covering to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 as she walks along the seawall in North Vancouver Wednesday, November 25, 2020.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
911 new COVID-19 cases, 11 deaths as B.C. sees deadliest week since pandemic began

Hospitalizations reach more than 300 across the province

Black Press Media and BraveFace have come together to support children facing life-threatening conditions. Net proceeds from these washable, reusable, three-layer masks go to Make-A-Wish Foundation BC & Yukon.
Put on a BraveFace: Help make children’s wishes come true

Black Press Media, BraveFace host mask fundraiser for Make-A-Wish Foundation

Summerland residents have been receiving a telephone scam with the number showing as the telephone number of the local RCMP detachment. (Black Press Media files)
Summerland RCMP telephone number spoofed in scam calls

Number used in scam attempts from tax agency

(Village of Lumby photo)
Mysterious, loud ‘boom’ shakes North Okanagan residents

Village staff, Earthquakes Canada aren’t sure what caused the explosion-like sound

Clarence Fulton students collect cash and non-perishable food donations for families in need in their community Friday, Nov. 27. (Jennifer Smith  - Morning Star)
North Okanagan students collect food for families in need

Annual event to support nine school families this year

Take a break from the slopes to discover the rich culture and diversity of Vernon. Michelle Beaudry photo, courtesy Tourism Vernon.
Tourism Vernon could see 40% cut to budget due to COVID-19

New approach to help residents and visitors activate their adventures

Danika Rennie and Myles Lowe sport some realistic fake facial hair for Parkview Elementary’s moustache day on Nov. 27. (Contributed)
Snapshot: Moustache Day at Parkview

Parkview Elementary students showed up with their best false facial hair on Nov. 27

Follow public health recommendations, says Interior Health as COVID-19 cases continue to climb in Revelstoke. (Image courtesy CDC)
Revelstoke positive COVID cases grows to 29

Interior Health announced a cluster in the community on Nov. 26

Screenshot of Pastor James Butler giving a sermon at Free Grace Baptist Church in Chilliwack on Nov. 22, 2020. The church has decided to continue in-person services despite a public health order banning worship services that was issued on Nov. 19, 2020. (YouTube)
2 Lower Mainland churches continue in-person services despite public health orders

Pastors say faith groups are unfairly targeted and that charter rights protect their decisions

Most Read