Members of the Mirella Project team: photographer Kayleigh Seibel and Maddie Burt, Eva Mosher and Caitlin Quilty, Avery Hanson, Izzy Schaffer and Jade Lutz, co-founder Tess Streicker and founder Mirella Ramsay, Robin Cannon-Milne and Noelle Ramsay. (Kayleigh Seibel photo)

Roots and Blues performer endorses young Salmon Arm climate change activists

Musician Luke Wallace inspired by non-profit Mirella Project

A performer at the 2019 Roots and Blues Festival encouraged people to follow the lead of a group ofyoung Salmon Arm climate change activists.

Luke Wallace has been a touring musician for six years, but started playing gigs when he was 14. His brand of music has been described as new wave political folk music which he uses to inspire audiences into action on social and environmental justice.

Read more: Valdy gives volunteers a hand after Salmon Arm Roots and Blues Festival

Read more: Salmon Arm Roots and Blues Festival exceeds expectations

Originally from Vancouver Island, the inspiration to write songs focused on protecting B.C.’s coastline came naturally, which in turn jump-started his music career.

“It’s something really near and dear to my heart, so it became an amazing vehicle to just start cruising around and meet other people who really want to protect the Coast and protect the rivers in their area,” Wallace said.

With the 50th anniversary of the legendary Woodstock Festival taking place over the Roots and Blues weekend, activism-focused music was especially poignant. In terms of the way music has been used as a rallying cry over decades, Wallace says not much has changed – only the topic and its severity.

“I think (music) fits in the same way that it has always fit in,” Wallace said. “There’s kind of this inevitability that comes with climate change, different from nuclear war where the concern was over the potential of it.”

Much of Wallace’s music has a dual focus, on the one hand it speaks directly to the concerns of climate change, while on the other it offers a solution in the youth climate-strike movement. Wallace especially noted the efforts made by the Mirella Project, a non-profit organization composed of local youth volunteers with the goal to educate citizens on issues of climate change.

“That’s a fired up group of mostly young women who are just rocking it and are saying it as it is, and I guarantee that needs, or could at least use, a whole bunch of money and a whole bunch of attention and a whole bunch of mentorship and resources,” he said.

In Wallace’s yet to be recorded song Jet Lag, the line ‘I love the land more than my country’ is featured many times throughout the song. He describes the line as a call to bringing the conversation of climate change to a global idea instead of a nationally focused issue.

“‘I love the land more than my country’ is a precedent,” he said. “We have to get to a place where we stop saying sh— like ‘national interest.’

Read more: Groovy B.C. wedding a throwback to Woodstock ‘69

Read more: In photos: The 27th Annual Salmon Arm Roots and Blues Festival

This refers to how the Trans Mountain pipeline has often been referred to as in the national interest of Canada by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

Wallace will be recording his newest album in September and hopes to continue working with climate change activists. As a musician, he hopes to return to Salmon Arm one day and be featured as a headliner for the Roots and Blues Festival.


@CameronJHT
Cameron.thomson@saobserver.net

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

 

Just Posted

Island road trip unkind to playoff-bound Silverbacks

As the ‘Backs hit the road, the chase for a better playoff berth in the Interior was heating up.

Word on the street: What is your biggest pet peeve regarding cellphone use?

In light of Unplug and Play Family Literacy Week run by the… Continue reading

In photos: Reino Keski-Salmi Loppet at Larch Hills

The race saw over 700 athletes take to the ski trails

Habitat for Humanity ReStore planned for former Safeway location in Salmon Arm

If renovations go as planned, store in Centenoka Park Mall could open in May or June

Salmon Arm mayor unconcerned over top court’s quash of plastic bag ban in Victoria

“I don’t think there is any turning back philosophically,” he said.

Officials reaching out to those in contact with Canada’s first coronavirus patient

The illness has sickened at least 1,975 people and killed 56 in China

Snow angels: B.C. volunteers shovel for those who can’t

‘They’ve helped me make it through the rest of the winter’

Kobe Bryant killed in California helicopter crash: reports

NBA star was reportedly in his private helicopter at the time of the crash

Investigation launched after six dead puppies dumped in Richmond hotel parking lot

RAPS reminds people they can always give up puppies they can’t take care of

Summerland Steam earn one win, one loss in hockey action

Junior B team in third place in division

It’s okay not to have kids, confesses mother of four

For someone who has committed parenting an obscene number of times, it… Continue reading

Risk of coronavirus low in B.C. as first case emerges in Toronto: officials

There have been no confirmed cases of the virus in B.C.

Pioneer families lived in Summerland’s Prairie Valley area

Darke and Dale families played roles in community’s early history

Most Read