Members of the Mirella Project team: photographer Kayleigh Seibel and Maddie Burt, Eva Mosher and Caitlin Quilty, Avery Hanson, Izzy Schaffer and Jade Lutz, co-founder Tess Streicker and founder Mirella Ramsay, Robin Cannon-Milne and Noelle Ramsay. (Kayleigh Seibel photo)

Roots and Blues performer endorses young Salmon Arm climate change activists

Musician Luke Wallace inspired by non-profit Mirella Project

A performer at the 2019 Roots and Blues Festival encouraged people to follow the lead of a group ofyoung Salmon Arm climate change activists.

Luke Wallace has been a touring musician for six years, but started playing gigs when he was 14. His brand of music has been described as new wave political folk music which he uses to inspire audiences into action on social and environmental justice.

Read more: Valdy gives volunteers a hand after Salmon Arm Roots and Blues Festival

Read more: Salmon Arm Roots and Blues Festival exceeds expectations

Originally from Vancouver Island, the inspiration to write songs focused on protecting B.C.’s coastline came naturally, which in turn jump-started his music career.

“It’s something really near and dear to my heart, so it became an amazing vehicle to just start cruising around and meet other people who really want to protect the Coast and protect the rivers in their area,” Wallace said.

With the 50th anniversary of the legendary Woodstock Festival taking place over the Roots and Blues weekend, activism-focused music was especially poignant. In terms of the way music has been used as a rallying cry over decades, Wallace says not much has changed – only the topic and its severity.

“I think (music) fits in the same way that it has always fit in,” Wallace said. “There’s kind of this inevitability that comes with climate change, different from nuclear war where the concern was over the potential of it.”

Much of Wallace’s music has a dual focus, on the one hand it speaks directly to the concerns of climate change, while on the other it offers a solution in the youth climate-strike movement. Wallace especially noted the efforts made by the Mirella Project, a non-profit organization composed of local youth volunteers with the goal to educate citizens on issues of climate change.

“That’s a fired up group of mostly young women who are just rocking it and are saying it as it is, and I guarantee that needs, or could at least use, a whole bunch of money and a whole bunch of attention and a whole bunch of mentorship and resources,” he said.

In Wallace’s yet to be recorded song Jet Lag, the line ‘I love the land more than my country’ is featured many times throughout the song. He describes the line as a call to bringing the conversation of climate change to a global idea instead of a nationally focused issue.

“‘I love the land more than my country’ is a precedent,” he said. “We have to get to a place where we stop saying sh— like ‘national interest.’

Read more: Groovy B.C. wedding a throwback to Woodstock ‘69

Read more: In photos: The 27th Annual Salmon Arm Roots and Blues Festival

This refers to how the Trans Mountain pipeline has often been referred to as in the national interest of Canada by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

Wallace will be recording his newest album in September and hopes to continue working with climate change activists. As a musician, he hopes to return to Salmon Arm one day and be featured as a headliner for the Roots and Blues Festival.


@CameronJHT
Cameron.thomson@saobserver.net

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

 

Just Posted

Shuswap elementary school suspends operations due to ‘musty odour’

Arrangements made for affected Sicamous students to attend class in three other schools

Salmon Arm history in photos: Do you remember when?

Salmon Arm Museum at R.J. Haney Heritage Village asks public to identify date photo was taken

Salmon Arm mall’s no-panhandling sign reported to be result of complaints

Bylaw moves homeless men to mall vicinity, city says they’re OK on sidewalk

Carnivorous praying mantis put to work in the Shuswap

Insects introduced to the region in the 1930s to control grasshoppers eating crops

Fewer than 250 caribou remain in Columbia Shuswap

Only one of four herds in region with stable population, still considered threatened

PHOTOS: Young protesters in B.C. and beyond demand climate change action

Many demonstaers were kids and teens who skipped school to take part

Walmart to quit selling e-cigarettes amid vaping backlash

U.S.’s largest retailer points to ‘growing’ complications in federal, state and local regulations

Column: Wildlife encounters in my own backyard

In Plain View by Lachlan Labere

Climate protesters temporarily shut down road in downtown Kelowna

Protesters are demanding politicans take action to stop climate change

Letter: Signs of oxygen depletion all around us

Writer considers effects of increased C02 levels

Security footage shows grab and go of cash in South Okanagan business break-in

Marla Black is asking for the public’s help in identifying the man who broke into Winemaster

Vehicle taken by gunpoint in South Okanagan carjacking recovered

Penticton RCMP said the criminal investigation remains very active and ongoing

Former B.C. lifeguard gets house arrest for possession of child porn

Cees Vanderniet of Grand Forks will serve six months of house arrest, then two years’ probation

Crown alleges resentment of ex-wife drove Oak Bay father to kill his daughters

Patrick Weir alleged in his closing arguments that Andrew Berry is responsible for the deaths of his daughters

Most Read