BC Cancer Radiation Oncologist Dr. Scott Tyldesley.

A new era for radiation therapy

Mounting evidence suggests precision radiation therapy leads to better outcomes for cancer patients

More than half of all people diagnosed with cancer need radiation therapy as part of their treatment. Over the last decade, mounting evidence has suggested that precision radiation therapy (PRT) can lead to better outcomes for patients with all types of cancer.

PRT uses specialized, highly-focused radiation techniques to cure cancer, prolong survival and increase quality of life. External beam PRT delivers radiation therapy to tumours from various positions around a person’s body, converging accurately on the tumour site.

“By delivering focused high doses of radiation over a shorter period of time, PRT limits the dose that healthy tissues surrounding the tumour receive, while increasing the dose to the tumour itself,” says BC Cancer Radiation Oncologist Dr. Scott Tyldesley.

Improving radiation therapy for children

Some 83% of Canadian children diagnosed with cancer survive and are at risk for long-term effects of radiation treatment. Because radiation therapy requires a high degree of accuracy, patients must remain perfectly still throughout treatment; this can be particularly challenging for children. Those who are especially “wiggly” undergo sedation, which comes with side effects, requires a longer procedure and the expertise of a specialized pediatric anesthesia team. Children traditionally also need more rigid immobilization and permanent tattoos which are used to mark the radiation targets on patients’ skin.

Real-time optical surface monitoring (OSM) is a precision tool that may eliminate the need for patients to be sedated, immobilization devices to keep patients still during treatment and permanent tattoos, while still maintaining accurate positioning.

While children stand to benefit the most from OSM, research suggests that OSM may be used in brain cancer patients as an alternative to more invasive procedures. “Our current goal is to support research projects into OSM that will lead to its adoption as standard of care at BC Cancer,” says Dr. Tyldesley.

Better results with fewer treatments

“Six Degrees of Freedom” Robotic Linac couches are essential for delivering precision radiation therapy and deliver complex techniques as efficiently as possible. Because the couches can move up, down, sideways and tilt in two directions, they allow for better positioning of the patient and targeting of the tumour.

For example, men with prostate cancer currently undergo 20-44 fractions of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) over four to nine weeks, requiring patients to make many visits to BC Cancer. With support from BC Cancer Foundation donors, a clinical trial recently launched to compare EBRT with a new PRT technique that reduces the number of treatments to as few as five visits.

The results of this trial could potentially improve outcomes for a significant number of men in B.C.

As the benefitting charity of the 2019 Fairchild Miss Chinese Vancouver Pageant Gala Dinner, the Foundation is raising funds to bring a new piece of surface-guided radiation equipment to BC Cancer – Vancouver. To donate to this initiative and to learn more, please visit: https://bccancerfoundation.com/MCVP

Just Posted

Accused in suspected Shuswap home invasion faces additional charges

One of men charged in Dec. 28 incident faces four counts from two weeks earlier

Driver ticketed after rollover on Highway 1 near Salmon Arm

Jeep Cherokee hit rock face before rolling multiple times

Foul play not currently suspected in death of man found near Sicamous

Body found in woods near vehicle linked to Edmonton police investigation of suspicious death

Boil water notice issued for North Shuswap community hall

Notice applies only to water system used by Scotch Creek facility

RCMP make request after safety flares prompt search on Shuswap Lake

Marine search and rescue crew finds boat unoccupied, no one in distress

B.C. records 62 new COVID-19 cases, two deaths since Friday

Province has just over 200 active cases

Summerland approves solar project

Despite community opposition, council voted 4-3 for Cartwright Mountain location

Police search for suspect in assault on woman in downtown Kelowna

Kelowna police received a report a woman had been assaulted by an unknown man on July 12

Hotel rooms for B.C. homeless too hasty, NDP government told

Businesses forced out, but crime goes down, minister says

Two positive COVID-19 cases at Oliver farm

The risk of exposure to the general public related to this farm is considered to be low

Oliver Town Hall closed to public as staffer displays COVID-19 symptoms

One staff member at Oliver Town Hall is being tested for coronavirus

Wage subsidy will be extended until December amid post-COVID reopening: Trudeau

Trudeau said the extension will ‘give greater certainty and support to businesses’

B.C. government prepares for COVID-19 economic recovery efforts

New measures after July consultation, Carole James says

Horoscopes for the week of July 13

Weekly horoscopes by Morgan Fava

Most Read