Dedicated to Conservative ideals

Serious and hard-working are two words Mel Arnold uses to describe himself.

Serious and hard-working are two words Mel Arnold uses to describe himself.

Raised on a dairy farm in Notch Hill, Arnold learned the work ethic early. It’s an attribute that served him well in business, as it led to his first job when one of his teachers hired him for boat building.

That’s a line of work that stuck.

Arnold, who is running under the Conservative banner in the federal North Okanagan Shuswap riding, has operated his Complete Marine Detailing business for 26 years.

“I built that from the ground up – I’m not so much hands on any more. Through that I’ve learned the importance of balanced budgets and planning ahead for possible hard times.”

Arnold and his high school sweetheart Linda have been married for 36 years.

“My wife and I are both proud to be lifetime residents,” he says.

Personality-wise, Arnold describes himself as “a listener, very much approachable. Serious. More on the serious side than on the fun-loving side.”

Arnold’s background includes volunteering, with two terms as president of the BC Wildlife Federation and six years as chair of governance with the Canadian Wildlife Federation.

Asked about his passions, the outdoors tops the list.

“I like to enjoy the outdoors any time I can. Hunting and fishing are my favourite passions but anytime I can be outdoors. And, oddly enough, governance is a passion. That’s why I was chair with the Canadian Wildlife Federation…,” he said.

Asked if he has trouble reconciling his love of the outdoors with the Conservative government’s much-criticized performance on the environment, he says: “My past roles have been as a conservationist, not a preservationist. I believe in the wise use of resources. The Conservatives have been very supportive of environmental issues. In fact last year, there was $252 million for the conservation plan. That will go towards protecting sensitive areas and programs aimed at conservation of natural resources.”

Regarding potential pipeline spills, he says, “With 21st century technology, I think the risks are reasonable, especially compared with the risks in rail disasters, like Lac-Mégantic.”

As for international criticism of Canada’s position regarding climate change and the Kyoto Accord, he says: “The agreement may have been over-ambitious in light that Canada produces only two per cent of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions. It’s very difficult to reduce those emissions when they’re already at a low level.”

Another issue the prime minister has received ongoing criticism about has revolved around muzzling dissent, as well as potential assaults on privacy such as Bill C51.

“Most of the powers in that bill existed already,” says Arnold. “The change is, it will allow different authorities to share information… about risks to the safety of Canadians, especially here at home.”

The three issues Arnold has in his sights are: families sustaining local jobs; infrastructure and the highway system; and advocating on behalf of seniors.

Arnold says he believes he would have a voice in Ottawa.

“Yes, I’m a team player, a team builder; my previous roles have prepared me for how to bring people on board with your ideas.”

He said he hasn’t met Stephen Harper but is confident Harper would listen to him. “Caucus is a very open system.”


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