A dose of the measles-mumps-rubella, or MMR, vaccine. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

Eight cases of measles confirmed in Vancouver outbreak

Coastal Health official say the cases stem from the French-language Ecole Jules Verne Secondary

Health officials have confirmed eight cases of measles in Vancouver, calling it an outbreak.

The cases surround a French-language high school, Ecole Jules Verne Secondary, in Vancouver, said Dr. Althea Hayden, medical health officer with Vancouver Coastal Health, in an update late Friday.

READ MORE: Measles outbreak in Washington state spurs warning from BC Centre for Disease Control

READ MORE: Maple Ridge mom calls for mandatory measles shots

“Cases are occurring in staff, students and family members affiliated with this school,” Hayden said. “We have determined that measles was brought into this community through travel outside of North America.”

People connected to two other schools, Anne-Hebert and Rose-Des-Vents elementaries, are among the eight cases.

These cases are not related to the first case reported in Vancouver, she said, from a man who had been travelling in the Philippines.

One person went to BC Children’s Hospital while they were infectious, Hayden said, and officials haven’t been able to notify everyone who may have been exposed.

You should contact your family doctor or Vancouver Coastal Health public health at 604-675-3900 if you were in that hospital’s emergency room at these times:

  • January 21, 2019 – 10am to 6:10pm
  • January 23, 2019 – 4:45pm to 11:10pm
  • January 24, 2019 – 8:13am to 11:40am
  • February 1, 2019 – 2:05pm to 6:55pm

An outbreak is defined as an increase in the number of cases officials expect to see at a certain time of year.

“The best thing people can do to protect themselves is to make sure their immunizations are up to date,” she said, adding that people with incomplete vaccines or no vaccines at all are at high risk.

Measles is highly contagious and spreads easily through the air when an infected person breathes, coughs or sneezes. The virus can survive in small droplets in the air for several hours.

Symptoms include a fever, cough, runny nose, and red and inflamed eyes, which typically start appearing seven to 14 days after initial exposure. These are followed three to seven days later by a rash, which lasts at least three days.

A measles outbreak in Washington State and Oregon this winter has sickened 56 people so far.


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Comments are closed

Just Posted

Sicamous to receive $6 million for construction of Shuswap Healing Centre

Federal/provincial infrastructure funding also announced for Chase pedestrian bridge

Neighbours raise concerns about proposed housing development in Salmon Arm

Objections to 11th Street SE plans include increased traffic, diversion of creek, loss of greenspace

Morning Start: Dogs can smell cancer

Your morning start for Tuesday, July 7, 2020

Salmon Arm Council pleased with plans for Habitat for Humanity housing project

Twenty-unit building, mainly for 55-plus seniors, in the works

B.C. highway widening job reduced, costs still up $61 million

Union-only project scales back work to widen Trans-Canada

B.C. records 31 new cases, six deaths over three days due to COVID-19

There are 166 active cases in B.C., 16 people in hospital

B.C. homeowners plead for action on condo insurance crisis

Strata property fees growing bigger than mortgage payments

Indigenous man behind complaint of BC Transplant’s alcohol abstinence policy has died

David Dennis, who is Nuu-chah-nulth, argued that six-month sobriety policy is a ‘lethal form of racism’

Hidden cameras in Okanagan forests catch illegal dumpers, lead to fines

The Okanagan Forest Task Force’s have led to 13 or 14 tickets for illegal dumpers

ICBC to resume road tests in July with priority for rebookings, health-care workers

Tests have been on hold for four months due to COVID-19

Urge travellers to follow COVID-19 rules in a ‘gentle way’: B.C.’s top doctor

Cases surging in the U.S. have B.C. officials hoping the border stays shut all summer

Shuswap history in pictures: Three-legged race

Race captured on a glass plate negative

Most Read