Pope Francis prays during the opening of a sex abuse prevention summit, at the Vatican, Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019.

French Cardinal resigns over sexual abuse cover-up

French Cardinal Philippe Barbarin was found guilty of covering up sexual abuse

French Cardinal Philippe Barbarin said Thursday he will offer his resignation to Pope Francis, after a court found him guilty of failing to report allegations of sexual abuse of minors by a priest.

The Lyon court’s surprise decision was seen by alleged victims as a victory for child protection and a strong signal to the Catholic Church.

The court handed Barbarin a six-month suspended prison sentence for not reporting the cases in the period between July 2014 and June 2015.

In a brief statement to the media, Barbarin said “I have decided to go and see the Holy Father to offer him my resignation.” He said he will meet Pope Francis “in a few days,” and expressed his “compassion” for the alleged victims.

Alleged victims of the Rev. Bernard Preynat claim Barbarin and other church officials covered up for him for years, but the statute of limitations had expired on some charges and even the victims had expected that the cardinal would be acquitted.

Five other defendants were acquitted.

READ MORE: Pope’s sex abuse prevention summit explained

In the court’s decision, read by The Associated Press, magistrates wrote that Barbarin “had the obligation to report” accusations because the alleged victims didn’t request the ecclesiastic secrecy.

Alexandre Hezez, one of the alleged victims and among those who brought the case to trial, met Barbarin in November 2014 and kept informing him that there were probably other victims.

“Cardinal Barbarin never showed any doubt about the information,” the court wrote.

Barbarin was not present at the Lyon court Thursday. His lawyer, Jean-Felix Luciani, said he will appeal.

“This is a decision that is not fair at the juridical level,” Luciani said. He added: “We hope that at the next step, justice will be done.”

The Vatican didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.

Preynat has confessed to abusing Boy Scouts in the 1970s and ’80s and will be tried separately.

Nine people who said the priest abused them brought the case against Barbarin to court.

“This is a victory that sends a strong signal to lots of victims and a signal to the church as well,” said Francois Devaux, president of the association “La Parole Liberee” (Lift the Burden of Silence), a group of victims of Preynat.

“We see that no one is above the law. We have been heard by the court. This is the end of a long path.”

A lawyer for some of Preynat’s alleged victims, Yves Sauvayre, called the verdict “historic.”

“The cardinal is convicted because he didn’t do what needed to be done,” he said.

The victims say top clergy had been aware of Preynat’s actions since 1991, but allowed him to be in contact with children until his 2015 retirement.

In addition to Barbarin, an archbishop, a bishop, a priest and two other officials had been on trial. Another top Catholic official, Cardinal Luis Ladaria, was among the accused — but didn’t appear in court because the Vatican invoked his diplomatic immunity.

In emotional proceedings during the four-day trial in January, several men recounted their fear and shame after they were abused.

Christian Burdet, 53, recalled how Preynat forced him to go into his tent when he was a 10-year-old Scout.

Describing years of suffering, Burdet said he wanted to “understand how this system was put in place” and help other victims to speak out.

Preynat’s trial is to be held by next year. The date has not been set yet. Only 13 cases out of an estimated total of 85 alleged victims will go to court, as the statute of limitations has expired for the others.

Last month, French judges refused to block the release in French cinemas of a movie based on the scandal by French director Francois Ozon.

The decision against Barbarin was handed down less than two weeks after the conviction of another “prince” of the church, Cardinal George Pell, was announced in his native Australia of sexually abusing two youths. He too is appealing.

READ MORE: Pope offers 21 proposals to fight abuse at start of sex abuse prevention summit

And it comes amid a reckoning among rank-and-file Catholics of how church leaders around the globe allowed decades of sexual abuse and coverup to fester. The resulting crisis in confidence in the hierarchy sparked Francis’ decision to convene church leaders from around the world for an extraordinary Vatican summit last month.

Also last month, Francis defrocked the onetime leader of the American Catholic Church, ex-Cardinal Theodore McCarrick, after a church investigation determined he sexually molested minors and adult men.

Sylvie Corbet in Paris and Nicole Winfield in Rome contributed to this report

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