Gardeners cautioned about invasive species

Spring is a critical time to watch out for invasive plants in backyards, farmland, parks and roadsides.

  • Apr. 18, 2014 10:00 a.m.

The Columbia Shuswap Invasive Species Society (CSISS) recently celebrated its first birthday, and has been hard at work documenting and taking action on invasive species in the region.

Spring is a critical time to watch out for invasive plants in backyards, farmland, parks and roadsides. As gardeners come out from winter hibernation, CSISS would like to make sure that seed orders avoid invasive varieties.

“Many weeds are originally introduced as garden flowers, and to this day some gardens continue to be a problematic source of spread” says Robyn Hooper, CSISS education and outreach officer. The introduction of invasive species into natural surroundings can have negative impacts on native plants, animals and even humans.

Prevention is key as it is often an up-hill battle with invasive species.  Beautiful ornamentals, such as Yellow Flag Iris, are deceptively dangerous invaders. Their showy yellow blooms are popular with gardeners; however, they can easily get out of control.  Yellow Flag Iris reproduce quickly through seed dispersal and horizontal root systems to create dense thickets in ditches, irrigation canals, marshes, stream and lake shorelines and shallow ponds.

“Local groups such as the Little White Lake Stewardship group have been working hard to combat this species and save important habitat for painted turtles,” says Natalie Stafl, CSISS coordinator.

This spring and summer, CSISS will attend a number of public events, as well as host presentations for schools, gardeners, trails users and other interested groups.

For more information or to book a presentation, contact info@columbiashuswapinvasives.org.

To learn more about invasive plants in our region or find out if your plant list contains any of these invaders, visit www.columbiashuswapinvasives.org or call 1-855-PUL-WEED.

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