Heat could break records

Environment Canada meteorologist Doug Lundquist says this week’s heat wave is expected to break records in the province

Beat the heat: Haillie Tennent

Beat the heat: Haillie Tennent

Don’t like the heat?

Blame it on Alaska and Arizona.

Environment Canada meteorologist Doug Lundquist says this week’s heat wave that is expected to break records in the province is the result of two ridges of high pressure, one from the north and one from the south, coming together to form one huge hot-weather system.

“We’re expecting a lot of records to fall,” he says, noting the all time high for B.C. was 44.4 C set in July 1941 in the Lytton and Lilloet areas.

“We probably won’t break that one but it’s gonna be in the high 30s, and that’s the top end of the envelope in the Shuswap.”

Lundquist says what is different about this high pressure system is that the switch from June monsoon to the hot, dryer climes of summer is about one week early.

While the system is now expected to begin breaking down, bringing cooler temperatures, they will still be in the mid-30 range.

Lundquist says Environment Canada is warning everyone to remain well hydrated, well-slathered with sunscreen making sure those who may be living on their own are also taking care of themselves.

“Never leave a child, another human or dog in a car without the motor running,” he cautions.

Caution is also coming from the B.C. Wildfire Management Branch of the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations.

Forest protection assistant Brady Holliday said Friday the 90 mm of rain that fell in June had lessened the wildfire risk in Salmon Arm – some areas of which had been in high danger rating.

“We’re currently in a state where it’s unlikely we’ll see fires generated from lightning, and if they do, they have a low potential for fire spread,” he said. “By next week, we should see fuels starting to dry out and there will be a higher potential for fire spread.”