If B.C. adopts year-round daylight time, each East Kootenay town would pick own time zone

Kootenay East MLA Tom Shypitka stopped by a recent regional district meeting to explain

A famous German physicist once said time is relative.

And when it comes to proposed changes to daylight saving time, the provincial government has made the issue relatively confusing.

Kootenay East MLA Tom Shypitka stopped by a monthly regional district meeting to explain the changes and how it will affect residents in the riding, which is in a different time zone than the rest of the province.

The proposed change under Bill 40 — the Interpretation Amendment Act — would see a year-round observance of Daylight Saving Time, calling it Pacific Time, to align with time changes being proposed in the northwestern U.S. and Western Canada.

The new Pacific Time is seven hours behind the standardized Coordinated Universal Time.

However, the challenge is that there are two other time zones in the province: Creston operates on Mountain Standard Time as does the Peace region, while, the East Kootenay observes Mountain Daylight Saving Time.

But the proposed change to year-round DST includes language that would let municipalities in the East Kootenay control their own destinies.

“Essentially what it says, is communities that use MST or MDT, it is up to them … [to] stay the same all year long or change between the two,” Shypitka told the meeting.

“In other words, if Cranbrook wanted to go to Mountain Standard Time, we would just make an application to the province and we could jump on board. That’s essentially what Creston did.”

Let’s go further down the rabbit hole.

Moving to year-round Pacific Daylight Saving Time would align with Mountain Standard Time.

“Essentially, we would have … if the U.S. coordinates with us … two different time zones with the same time,” Shypitka said. “Mountain Standard Time will be the exact same as Pacific Time.”

Alberta is also determining how it wants to standardize time.

READ MORE: More than 90% of British Columbians want permanent daylight time, survey says

Shypitka suggested waiting for Alberta’s review to be complete before moving forward, given the region’s ties to it.

Kimberley Mayor Don McCormick agreed: “What Alberta does is absolutely critical to us. Having a discussion with any of the tourists who come out here, one hour to Albertans is huge and I think we need to take that into consideration or risk upending the whole pattern of tourism traffic.”

Implementation would begin after ‘springing forward’ an hour in March, and then leaving the clocks alone in the fall.



trevor.crawley@cranbrooktownsman.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Tough time for tree fruits as some B.C. farm products soar

Province reports record 2019 sales, largely due to cannabis

Electric vehicle chargers being installed at Salmon Arm Canadian Tire

The chargers operated by Electrify Canada are expected to be operational by the fall.

Okanagan College bestows highest honour to five individuals

Couple from Westbank First Nation and men from Vernon, Kelowna and Shuswap named Honourary Fellows

Bikers Are Buddies set up in North Okanagan-Shuswap

Non-profit motorcycle group rides to raise awareness around bullying

Salmon Arm Rotary Club doubles donations for food bank, women’s shelter

Donation matching initiative raises $22,000 for SAFE Society, Second Harvest

21 new COVID-19 cases confirmed in B.C. as virus ‘silently circulates’ in broader community

Health officials urge British Columbians to enjoy summer safely as surge continues

Bikers Are Buddies set up in North Okanagan-Shuswap

Non-profit motorcycle group rides to raise awareness around bullying

Separate trials set for 2018 Kelowna Canada Day killing

Four people have been charged with manslaughter in relation to Esa Carriere’s death, including two youths

Kootnekoff: New workplace harassment and violence requirements

Susan Kootnekoff is the founder of Inspire Law, her diverse legal career spans over 20 years.

Dyer: Buying an electric car

Kristy Dyer is a columnist for Black Press Media who writes about the environment

Summerland Museum to hold walking tours

Community’s past will be explained during series of summer tours

Summerland mayor asks for community conversation following racist vandalism

Home of Indo-Canadian family in Summerland was targeted on evening of July 13

HERGOTT: Goodbye column

Paul Hergott is taking a break from writing for Black Press

Province agrees to multimillion-dollar payout for alleged victims of Kelowna social worker

Robert Riley Saunders is accused of misappropriating funds of children — often Indigenous — in his care

Most Read