Plans to rename Roderick Haig-Brown Park proceed

Plans to rename Roderick Haig-Brown Park proceed

A Secwepemc name, Tsútswecw Park, will be used at the request of the Little Shuswap Indian Band.

A prominent park in the Shuswap may be getting a name change as part of Indigenous reconciliation efforts from the provincial government.

Roderick Haig-Brown Park in the North Shuswap will be renamed to the traditional Secwepemc name Tsútswecw Park, which translates to “many fish,” at the request of the Little Shuswap Indian Band.

The park is known for its bi-annual run of sockeye salmon in the Adams River, and archaeological studies of the area have uncovered evidence of large settlements.

While discussion around the name change had upset some residents, relatives of Roderick Haig Brown, were on board with the plan to rename the site with a Secwepemc name.

Related link: Plan to change park’s name pleases family

Related link: The Haig-Brown legacy

A total of three provincial parks will be renamed to reflect their historic and cultural significance as part of reconciliation efforts with Indigenous peoples, if proposed legislative amendments introduced are passed.

“These amendments allow our government to take an important step forward towards our ongoing reconciliation efforts with Indigenous peoples throughout British Columbia, which includes honouring the commitments we made under the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples,” said George Heyman, Minister of Environment and Climate Change Strategy. “The renaming of these parks to traditional Indigenous names, as rooted in history, reflect the significant heritage values recognized by all British Columbians and beyond.”

The other two parks proposed for a name change are Brooks Peninsula Park on Vancouver Island, which will be renamed to Mquqwin/Brooks Peninsula Park and Boya Lake Park near the northwestern B.C. border which will be renamed Tā Ch’ilā Park, meaning “holes in a blanket,” at the request of the Kaska Dena First Nation.

The amendments also include several additions to existing parks and a conservancy, the largest being on Haida Gwaii, where more than 1,200 hectares are proposed to be added to Duu Guusd Conservancy.

Proposed additions also include six hectares of foreshore to Otter Lake Park near Princeton; 3.43 hectares to Syringa Park near Castlegar; 17 hectares to Monashee Park north of Vernon and southwest of Revelstoke; 85 hectares to Tā Ch’ilā Park (a.k.a. Boya Lake Park) in the northwestern part of the province; 3.26 hectares to E. C. Manning Park near Princeton; and 4.265 hectares to Kleanza Creek Park near Terrace.


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