A grant of $5,810,000 will go to the Duteau Creek water treatment plant for UV disinfection. - Morning Star file photo

Repairs require shutdown of North Okanagan city’s water disinfection

Customers asked not to worry, as chlorination still in effect

A permanent fix to Vernon’s main water source means a temporary shutdown of treatment.

The Duteau Creek ultraviolet disinfection facility is being turned off for repairs.

“The water is still treated and is safe,” water quality manager Tricia Brett said.

The Regional District of North Okanagan asks customers not to worry, as their water is still treated with chlorine, “which is an effective disinfection treatment against viruses like COVID-19.”

This work is continuing from a previous leak.

In the fall of last year, a leak was discovered in the pipe that carries water from the Duteau Creek UV disinfection facility to customers. A temporary fix in the fall of 2019 allowed for the treatment plant to continue running. This spring, the plan to repair the leak was postponed due to snow and waiting for a mechanical part; therefore, the permanent fix was postponed until irrigation season was completed. Greater Vernon Water will now be working on a permanent fix.

This means the UV portion of water treatment will be temporarily turned-off to allow for repairs. While water will not be treated with UV, the water will still be treated with the clarification process (Diffused Air Floatation or DAF) and chlorine by the Duteau Creek Water Treatment Plant. This is the same treatment process that was in place for years until the UV facility was turned on in February 2019.

Work began the morning of Nov. 16, and further public updates will be provided.

All customers on the Greater Vernon water system are currently on the Duteau Creek water source. The Kalamalka Lake source was turned off on Oct. 24, 2020 due to increased algae counts.

READ MORE: Vernon water source shut off due to algae increase

Out of an abundance of caution, anyone wishing additional protection, including infants, and those with a compromised immune system may wish to boil water for drinking, washing fruits and vegetables, making beverages or ice, or when brushing teeth.

READ MORE: New video explains how City of Vernon utility bills are calculated


@VernonNews
jennifer@vernonmorningstar.com

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