Salmon Arm man could face 10 years without parole

If the Crown is successful in its application to have him sentenced as an adult, the killer could face 10 years of parole ineligibility.

  • Jul. 29, 2016 7:00 p.m.
Police tape blocks off an area behind Bastion Elementary School following the murder of Tyler Myers.

Police tape blocks off an area behind Bastion Elementary School following the murder of Tyler Myers.

By Tim Petruk, Kamloops This Week

A Salmon Arm man who was convicted last month of first-degree murder in relation to the 2008 shooting death of a romantic rival could face 10 years in prison before being eligible for parole. Tyler Myers, 22, was shot to death in the Bastion elementary schoolyard in Salmon Arm on Nov. 21, 2008. The 24-year-old man found guilty of his murder cannot be named under the Youth Criminal Justice Act because he was 16 when Myers was killed.

The killer’s ex-girlfriend, now a 25-year-old woman, is expected to stand trial on first-degree murder in November. During the killer’s trial, she was painted by defence lawyer Donna Turko as the mastermind behind the murder. She also cannot be named because she was 17 at the time of Myers’ death.

Both accused were charged four years after the slaying, following a months-long RCMP Mr. Big undercover operation that culminated in confessions from both suspects. Court heard the killer shot Myers three times. The first shot was fired as he hid in a treed area in the schoolyard. He then emerged and fired two more shots, including one into Myers’ head.

Jurors heard both Myers and the killer were involved romantically with the female accused. Following the killer’s conviction, the Crown said it planned to seek an adult sentence. During a brief hearing on Wednesday, B.C. Supreme Court Justice Sheri Donegan ordered a placement report be done for the killer to determine the type of institution in which he should serve his sentence.

If the Crown is successful in its application to have him sentenced as an adult, the killer could face a life sentence with 10 years of parole ineligibility. If sentenced as a youth, he would serve no more than six years behind bars. He has been in custody since his arrest in 2012.