Update: Wind cancels burn-off plans for Snowy Mountain fire

The Snowy Mountain fire did not grow overnight Tuesday and remains 40 per cent contained

Update: 8 p.m.

The Snowy Mountain wildfire is estimated to be three kilometres from the U.S. border as it burns in a outward direction.

BC Wildfire Service noted that smoke is drifting from the fire to adjacent areas and the smoke column and open flame is visible from the surrounding communities.

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Update 6:10 p.m.

Burn-off operations on the southeast corner planned for Tuesday afternoon were postponed according a Tweet by BC Wildfire.

Winds were the cause of the delay.

The BC Wildfire Service plans to reassess the burn-off plan in the morning.

Update 11 a.m.

If weather and winds co-operate a burn-0ff on the southeast corner of the Snowy Mountain fire will happen this afternoon. Residents will seen an increase of smoke during the operation.

The goal is to remove fuels from the slopes adjacent to properties in order to halt the forward progression of the fire. Bucketing helicopters will be in the area to support the burn-off operations.

“Fire equipment will be demobilized in some areas where it is no longer required, due to the successful efforts made by crews. Structural protection specialists will continue to assess properties on the valley bottom, moving south along the Chopaka Road down to the U.S. border,” a release from BC Wildfire stated.

Original:

Residents in and around Keremeos and Cawston can breathe another sigh of relief this morning as BC Wildfire is reporting for the second day in a row that the the Snowy Mountain fire did not grow overnight.

The size of the fire is estimated at 12,039 hectares and is listed at 40 per cent contained.

A lot of work continues in the Keremeos and Chopaka areas.

Fire activity was most active in the Chopaka area Aug 3 to 4. BC Wildfire Service and Keremeos Volunteer Fire Department members worked throughout the night to save homes. At the time of this posting several outbuildings were lost to the fire, but no primary residents.

Related: Updated: Snowy Mountain wildfire now 40 per cent contained

At the time of this posting, 89 firefighters and nine pieces of heavy equipment were expected to work the fire Tuesday. Eleven helicopters are being used to fight both the Snowy Mountain Fire and the Placer Mountain fire approximately 36 kilometres west.

“The fire was most active yesterday above the inversion, within a mountainous bowl and ravine on the northeast of the fire and on the west flank. Last night crews continue to work on the east flank. yesterday, crews worked to secure the north flank and tie it into rocky slopes in order to keep the fire from wrapping around towards Keremeos,” a release from BC Wildfire stated.

Other crews continued work on the east flank to mop-up and patrol along Chopaka Road. An existing road system in the Roberts Creek area, south of the fire, will be used as a containment line.

Related: Keremeos firefighters working night patrols as Snowy Mountain fire rains ash, embers

At the time of this posting the fire was burning to the west of Chopaka Road, but in southward direction and was approximately three kilometres from the U.S. border.

The BC Wildfire Service Incident Management Team assigned to the Snowy Mountain Fire is working collaboratively with the U.S. Forest Service, U.S. Bureau of Land Management, and the Washington State Department of Natural Resources given the fire’s proximity to the border.

To report a typo, email:
editor@keremeosreview.com
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@TaraBowieBC
editor@keremeosreview.com


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