Splatsin Nation near Enderby encourages Canadians to learn its true history as it prepares to launch a public presentation of its history to coincide with the first National Day of Truth and Reconciliation Thursday, Sept. 30. (Black Press - file photo)

Splatsin Nation near Enderby encourages Canadians to learn its true history as it prepares to launch a public presentation of its history to coincide with the first National Day of Truth and Reconciliation Thursday, Sept. 30. (Black Press - file photo)

Splatsin Nation near Enderby to share its history

Band calls for Canadians to learn true history as it prepares to honour first National Day of Truth and Reconciliation Thursday, Sept. 30

Editor’s note: The story below may trigger difficult or traumatic thoughts and memories. The Indian Residential School Survivors Society’s 24-hour crisis line is available at 1-866-925-4419

Splatsin is urging Canadians to learn their true history, not the history that’s been taught in the country’s public education system.

Thursday, Sept. 30, marks the inaugural National Day for Truth and Reconciliation in Canada and to commemorate the day, Splatsin has launched a public presentation about its history.

Secwepemc Nation Tribal Chief and Splatsin Kukpi7 (Chief) Wayne Christian welcomes the federal statutory holiday to honour the lost children and survivors of residential schools, their families, and their communities.

“This day will become our Remembrance Day that will be honoured for the next seven generations for the lives lost under the genocidal laws of Canada,” said Christian, adding that acknowledging Canada’s genocide is the first step to moving forward together as a country.

“Canadians have to accept some responsibility in this. Learn the true history of Canada, not the history that has been taught to you in schools — Canada is built on the backs of our people, on the graves of our children and from the wealth of our lands and resources. Canadians need to know and acknowledge that.”

Splatsin acknowledges that the unimaginable events of the past cannot be undone; however, the future of Indigenous children and Canada is in all our hands.

“Knucwentwecw (Secwepemctsin for helping each other) and learning our history and opening dialogue when individuals and communities are ready to talk, are critical to advancing the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s 94 calls to action,” said Christian.

Splatsin encourages Canadians to follow these steps on the inaugural statutory holiday:

• Learn about the history of Indigenous communities in Canada from the communities themselves, not the current public education system;

• Read the 94 Calls to Action in the Truth and Reconciliation Report and recognize your role in the work that needs to be done;

• Learn how to properly acknowledge the land we live on;

• Create opportunities for dialogue for Indigenous people and trust Indigenous leaders.

READ MORE: Splatsin Nation members walk children’s spirits home from Kamloops residential school

READ MORE: Splatsin suspends events due to ‘alarming’ number of COVID cases

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First NationsTruth and Reconciliation