A video shared by the Delta Police Department shows a car on Highway 17 weaving in and out of traffic at a high rate of speed, narrowly missing a police officer stopped on the side of the road. (Delta Police Department photo)

VIDEO: B.C. police officer nearly struck by speeding car

Footage shows a car in Delta weaving in and out of highway traffic and passing in a right turn lane

Delta police have released a video showing a speeding vehicle narrowly missing an officer conducting a traffic stop.

The video, shot on Monday, Sept. 30, shows a car weaving in and out of traffic at a high rate of speed. The vehicle moves into a right turn lane to bypass traffic, nearly clipping a Delta police officer and the vehicle he had pulled over.

Another driver, concerned by what he had witnessed, happened to catch the incident on his dash cam and turned the video over to the Delta Police Department.

According a press release accompanying the footage, the officer never got a look at the driver but felt the wind at his back as the driver narrowly avoided colliding with both his vehicle and him. The officer’s unmarked car had its red and blue flashing lights activated during the stop, though the low quality of the video deosn’t capture the lights well.

“Our officers were able to isolate the licence plate of the car in question from the video, and the officer who was nearly struck decided to pay a visit in person with the registered owner of the vehicle,” Acting-Inspector Ryan Hall, who oversees DPD’s traffic unit, said in press release.

The registered owner, who lives in Delta, received a $368 ticket for driving without due care and attention, however because the driver is unidentified, the ticket does not comes with its typical six points.

“This type of driving behaviour is so reckless,” Hall said. “This is exactly how fatal collisions happen. Less than a second of difference and we could have had a significantly different outcome. It was a beautiful sunny afternoon. It takes just one person, with selfish or unthinking driving behaviour, to cause unbelievable carnage and pain. We would also ask people to slow down and move to the opposite lane as dictated in the Motor Vehicle Act for their and the officers’ safety.”

Motorists in B.C. are required to slow down and move over for all vehicles stopped alongside the road that have flashing red, blue or yellow lights. This includes first responders, maintenance workers, tow trucks, Commercial Vehicle Safety Enforcement personnel, land surveyors, animal control workers, garbage collectors and other roadside workers.

To learn more about the Slow Down, Move Over law, head to www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/transportation/driving-and-cycling/road-safety-rules-and-consequences/slow-down-move-over.



editor@northdeltareporter.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Larger City of Salmon Arm flusher truck requires bigger building

Council approves $25,000 to extend building in public works yard

Salmon Arm cannabis retailers reflect on legalization

Edible products now legal, not expected to be available until December

CSRD won’t pursue referendum for Centennial Field purchase

Public opposition to borrowing $1.77 for park land heard by board directors

Memorial bench honours the contribution of former Salmon Arm fire chief Pat Shirley

The Shirley family has a long history with the Salmon Arm department going back to the early 1900s.

Kraft Heinz Project Play voting underway, an opportunity to light Larch Hills

Public participation needed to win $250,000 in project funding

VIDEO: First all-female spacewalk team makes history

NASA astronauts Christina Koch and Jessica Meir did work on International Space Station’s power grid

Zantac, the over-the-counter heartburn drug, pulled in Canada, U.S.

Health Canada also investigates possible carcinogen in some ranitidine drugs

Natalie MacMaster makes Okanagan one of two B.C. stops

Queen of the Fiddle in town Oct. 24

Shooters compete in Summerland

Seven youth participants take aim

B.C. public safety minister says cannabis edibles not in stores til January

Mike Farnworth says he wants regional issues considered when it comes to licensing

Salmon Arm history in pictures: Apple harvest time

Denis Marshall writes, “Apple-harvest time lent a quickened pace and pungent aroma… Continue reading

Greta Thunberg calls for climate action in Alberta, but doesn’t talk oilsands

Swedish teen was met with some oil and gas industry supporters who came in a truck convoy

RDOS cannabis production bylaw goes to public hearing

Hearing on micro cannabis production facilities will be held Nov. 21

Scheer denies spreading ‘misinformation’ in predicting unannounced Liberal taxes

Conservative leader had claimed that a potential NDP-Liberal coalition could lead to a hike in GST

Most Read