WATCH: Conservation group releases short doc on saving South Okanagan’s ‘precious’ Sickle Point

Sickle Point, the last intact wetland near Skaha Lake, is facing the prospect of development

The ongoing fight by a local conservation group to save Sickle Point from development isn’t over yet.

The Save Sickle Point Committee, a grassroots community group, has teamed up with Penticton’s Tempest Theatre and Film Society to release a short film on Sickle Point — the last intact riparian wetland near Skaha Lake in Kaladen.

The video features MP Richard Cannings, author Don Gayton, and several Kaleden residents all speaking to the importance of saving Sickle Point from development.

“We were so excited and grateful when Tempest Theatre and Film Society offered their help produce a film which would focus on Sickle Point and the need to protect it,” said Evelyn Kansy, fundraising coordinator for the Save Sickle Point Committee.

Tempest artistic director Kate Twa said the project was a way to expand into new mediums during the pandemic and help a cause they are passionate about.

”While live performance and our professional actor training programs are on pause, we have turned to the medium of film to stay active and connected with our audience,” Twa said. “Working on projects like Save Sickle Point is important, good work. Together as a community, we are stronger if we have a healthy ecosystem — from wetlands to arts.”

Local taxpayers rejected the Regional District of Okanagan-Similkameen’s plans to buy the land back in February. Now, if Sick Point is to be saved, the committee must raise funds all on its own.

READ MORE: Alternative Approval Process overwhelmingly rejected for Sickle Point purchase

Save Sickle Point Committee and Tempest Theatre and Film Society hope the film will encourage people to make a pledge to purchase this important place for everyone and as a legacy future generations.

Watch the video below:

Meanwhile, members of the Sickle Point Committee are busy fundraising through social media and the crowdfunding site wayblaze.com/sicklepoint.

Applications to grants and foundations have also been submitted. An online petition requesting the provincial government to help protect the property and review vehicle access issues to the Sickle Point via the KVR trail is available at change.org/SaveSicklePoint.

“We are confident that once people realize what we really will lose should Sickle Point be developed they will want to help save this unique place,” Kansy said. “The rare natural habitats, loss of viewscape, cars and other vehicles on the trail and the peace and enjoyment of nature will truly be missed if it is not protected.”

The committee has until June 1 to reach their fundraising goal.

READ MORE: RDOS has an accepted offer of $2.5M for Sickle Point

READ MORE: Save Sickle Point Committee not giving up on efforts



jesse.day@pentictonwesternnews.com

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Environment