The cover to “Action Comics” No. 1000 was illustrated by DC co-publisher Jim Lee. (DC Entertainment)

COLUMN: Newspaper comic strips reflect real life

Insights and observations can be found in the comic strips

​A subscription to the local newspaper in our house meant anticipation of the Sunday edition.

My Dad would take the majority of the paper off to his spot on the couch along with a cup of coffee and the rest of us kids would take turns reading the “funny pages.”

The Sunday cartoons were extra special because they were in colour, not just black and white like the rest of the week.

Comic strips were our first introduction to reading the newspaper. My sister and brothers had their favourites. Calvin and Hobbes, Garfield and Hagar the Horrible.

My brother liked The Far Side comics so much that he would cut them out of the paper and save them.

​ When I asked my Dad which comic was his favourite, he mentioned without hesitation that he used to love Pogo.

Written by American cartoonist Walt Kelly, Pogo launched in 1948 and ran for 27 years.

Set in the Okefenokee swamp, Pogo Possum and his sidekick Albert Alligator got into all kinds of trouble. Walt Kelly also got into some trouble when his cartoons began to take on a more political slant, and he introduced a character that acted a lot like U.S. Senator Joseph McCarthy.

Brilliant with the subversive jabs at politicians of the day, Pogo was a champion for the powerless.

He also loved to fish and go picnicking, kind of like my Dad.

​If a comic strip was ever meant to champion the downtrodden and bullied, then the most famous of all would be Peanuts, written by Charles M. Shulz.

The iconic character of Charlie Brown is unforgettable, especially this time of year, when reruns of “A Charlie Brown Christmas” are still popular.

READ ALSO: ‘Shazam!’ debuts with $53.5M, handing DC Comics another win

READ ALSO: Archie comic characters Betty, Veronica and FP Jones visit Victoria 23 years apart

We all know what it means when someone tells us they bought a Charlie Brown Christmas tree. It’s become part of our vernacular.

The cartoon special was also a reminder that not everyone is happy and cheerful during the holiday season. As Linus says about the tree, “Maybe it just needs a little love.”

​Peanuts cartoons appeared in newspapers from 1950 until 2000.

Fifty years of Charlie Brown trying to kick a football and always missing.

If the cartoon taught kids anything, it was to keep trying, no matter how scared or nervous they may be.

​Flying down a hill on a sled with a stuffed tiger sitting behind you is the antithesis of scared and nervous.

Six-year-old Calvin and his faithful tiger Hobbes took childhood activities to the next level.

Those trips usually ended in a spectacular crash, all while waxing philosophical on the way down. Calvin and Hobbes creator Bill Watterson credits both Charles Schulz and Walt Kelly as big inspirations for his popular comic strip, which only ran for 10 years.

​Comic books rarely sit for long on our library shelves.

They are some of the best loved books in our collection.

Beginning Jan. 2, the library display case will be full of Garfield, Far Side, Calvin and Hobbes and Peanuts ready for you to read and have a laugh.

Come in and tell us about your favourite newspaper comic strip!

Caroline McKay is the Community Librarian for the Summerland branch of the Okanagan Regional Library.

To report a typo, email:
news@summerlandreview.com
.



news@summerlandreview.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

 

From Captain America’s ’40s debut, by Joe Simon and Jack Kirby. (Handout courtesy of Timely/Marvel Comics)

Just Posted

Development plans in Salmon Arm move forward despite pandemic

March building stats up over last year, city’s planning meeting includes seven applications

Okanagan College student in Salmon Arm designs map tracking spread of COVID-19 in B.C.

Sean Heddle says fighting complacency and misinformation is important

Q&A: Interior Health CEO answers questions on COVID-19 response

Susan Brown, president and CEO of Interior Health, answers questions regarding COVID-19

“I call her my adopted daughter”: Salmon Arm couple embrace student exchange experience

Rotary Youth Exchange students choose to shelter in place during COVID-19 pandemic

Salmon Arm firefighters sound sirens in support of hospital staff

Fire chief hopes to have more emergency responders involved in upcoming parade

B.C. couple celebrates 61st anniversary through seniors’ home window

Frank and Rena Phillips marked occasion at Nanaimo Seniors Village this week while social distancing

COVID-19: South Okanagan community salutes frontline medical staff

“Honk for the unsung heros. Thanks to each and every one of you”

A look at some of the B.C. inventors creating life-saving tools in fight against COVID-19

Groups across B.C. are working together to create what they hope will help people affected by the pandemic

Association launches French-language games, online tools for families learning at home

Games, culture and vocabulary included in new virtual resources

‘There can be no ambiguity’: Travellers brought home to B.C. must self-isolate

Health Minister Adrian Dix said the mandatory isolation must be abided by

Interior Health confirms five additional cases in West Kelowna COVID-19 outbreak

The total amount of confirmed cases at Bylands Nurseries Ltd. is 19; no further cases expected

Summerland’s April 1 snow measurements above normal

Measurements taken at Summerland Reservoir and Isintok Lake

Okanagan Skaha School Board does not anticipate closures

School district budget tight as a result of declining enrolment

55+ BC Games cancelled amid COVID-19 concerns

Greater Victoria set to host 2021 event

Most Read