Global warming stalled politically too

Gordon Campbell's "climate action" era is ending and gas is gearing up. Fire up the Learjets and cue the dancing polar bears

A protester from the Occupy Wall Street 'movements'  is interviewed outside the United Nations in New York before a climate conference opened by UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon

A protester from the Occupy Wall Street 'movements' is interviewed outside the United Nations in New York before a climate conference opened by UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon

VICTORIA – On most issues this column discusses, the feedback I receive is generally negative.

One exception has been human-caused climate change, where my mail runs three to one in favour of a skeptical approach. Most express relief at having someone question the exaggerated or false claims advanced by environmentalists who strive to paint Alberta and B.C. as home to uniquely evil climate crimes.

As mentioned last week, this is an urgent issue in B.C. as the government pushes to develop liquefied natural gas exports.

The B.C. Liberal approach to limit only the “intensity” of greenhouse gas emissions from LNG production, and make no commitment on the majority of emissions from upstream gas production, looks like the effective end of Gordon Campbell’s crusade to lead North America in “climate action.”

The government has also abandoned Campbell’s collapsed effort to set up a cap-and-trade system with various U.S. states to regulate emissions. Which brings me to a key reason for public skepticism.

Going back to Jean Chrétien’s lip service to the Kyoto Accord, the world-wide effort to rein in fossil fuel emissions has been a smog of hypocrisy, hollow promises and failed experiments.

The next grand climate summit is scheduled for Paris next summer, although the vast international green bureaucracy will first have to jet to Peru for a pre-summit summit in December. Expect dancing polar bears in the hot sun.

The European Union has just agreed to a Campbell-like new target to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 40 per cent by 2030. But that’s dependent on the Paris summit reaching a legally binding international deal, something the United States remains unwilling to do. Meanwhile, Germany is building new coal-fired power plants.

In Ontario, a grandiose scheme to replace coal-fired power with wind, solar and other renewables has produced steeply rising electricity rates and a political scandal over a cancelled plan to build gas-fired capacity.

The public continues to be bombarded with ginned-up stories of environmental destruction. You may have seen shocking TV reports in October of a “haul-out” of thousands of walruses on beaches around the Chukchi Sea in Alaska and Russia, with animals trampling each other.

The World Wildlife Fund and U.S. biologists rushed to media to frame this as a crisis caused by a lack of sea ice.

This claim has been demolished by Susan Crockford, an evolutionary biologist who teaches at the University of Victoria. Her paper and brief video document a long, pre-industrial history of these events. She concludes that they are a sign of overpopulation in the now-protected walrus herds.

Crockford’s website debunks similar claims made about supposedly disappearing polar bears that have been a mainstay over the years to drive the global warming catastrophe narrative.

In terms of actual reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, there are signs of progress. The United States has made considerable strides, thanks to abundant shale gas that has allowed it to switch from some of its 600-odd coal-fired power plants.

Which brings us back to B.C.’s push for natural gas exports. The NDP claims to support this, but has spent hours in the legislature warning of a giveaway of the resource, imagined fracking disasters and LNG tanker explosions and everything else they can dream up to throw at it.

This is the same party that campaigned against the carbon tax in 2009 and hasn’t had a coherent energy policy since.

But this isn’t some partisan game. It’s about whether B.C. maintains its gas industry. And so far natural gas is the only thing that has substantially cut carbon emissions.

Tom Fletcher is legislature reporter and columnist for Black Press. Twitter: @tomfletcherbc

 

Just Posted

Shuswap Immigrant Services Society plans to hold a vigil on Friday, June 25 at 8 p.m. to honour the victims of what officials are calling a terrorist attack on five Muslims in London, Ont. (File photo)
Salmon Arm council holds minute of silence to honour victims of Ontario attack

Shuswap Immigrant Services Society plans vigil for Muslim family on June 25, 8 p.m. at McGuire Lake

(Pixabay photo)
Morning Start: Goosebumps helped scare off predators

Your morning start for Tuesday, June 15, 2021

A first-dose mobile vaccination clinic is being held on Tuesday, June 15 from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the Salmon Arm fairgrounds, west entrance across from spray park. (Interior Health image)
Location for Salmon Arm’s June 15 COVID-19 mobile vaccine clinic changes slightly

Immunization clinic still at fairgrounds but people attending asked to use different entrance

Felix Haase and Jayme Saretzky staff a pop-up booth to support the Salmon Arm Pride Project on the patio of the newly reopened Wild Craft Mercantile at 121 Shuswap St. on Saturday, June 12, 2021. (Martha Wickett - Salmon Arm Observer)
Wild Craft Mercantile in Salmon Arm holds grand reopening, celebrates Pride month

Store moves from Lakeshore to Shuswap, demonstrates support for Pride project

A City of Salmon Arm vacuum truck cleans out the city storm drain on Hudson Avenue in Salmon Arm Monday morning, June 14 after a crane truck blew a hydraulic line, spewing oil onto the road. (Martha Wickett - Salmon Arm Observer)
Fire trucks called to small oil spill in Salmon Arm

Traffic delayed on Hudson Avenue Monday morning after crane truck blows hydraulic line

People watch a car burn during a riot following game 7 of the NHL Stanley Cup final in downtown Vancouver, B.C., in this June 15, 2011 photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Geoff Howe
10 years ago: Where were you during the 2011 Vancouver Stanley Cup Riots?

Smashed-in storefronts, looting, garbage can fires and overturned cars some of the damage remembered today

Vernon Elks Lodge secretary-treasurer Maureen Sather says special relief funding for the organization courtesy of Community Futures North Okanagan has been just that: a relief. (Photo submitted)
Zero funding for Vernon Elks club

Once-in-100-years grant denied after back and forth with city for support

Lyndsay Fillier and Braden Taylor have been living the van life for four years and they've detailed the first year of their adventures in a new book. (Twila Amato/Black Press Media)
VIDEO: Okanagan couple details first year of van life in new book

Lyndsay Fillier and Braden Taylor have been living the van life for four years

The cannabis dispensary store, located at 1024 Clark Drive in East Vancouver. (Instagram/Budwayonclark)
Vancouver pot shop owner ordered to pay $40K for copying Subway

Store’s mascot is a red-eyed, cannabis-filled smoking sandwich

A young child was taken to hospital after being struck by a vehicle on 30th Avenue in Vernon Friday, June 11, 2021. (Jennifer Smith - Morning Star)
Child OK after being hit by car in Vernon

Father says daughter was back home by supper time

A health-care worker holds up a sign signalling she needs more COVID-19 vaccines at the ‘hockey hub’ mass vaccination facility at the CAA Centre during the COVID-19 pandemic in Brampton, Ont., on Friday, June 4, 2021. This NHL-sized hockey rink is one of CanadaÕs largest vaccination centres. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
‘Vaxxed to the max’: Feds launch Ask an Expert campaign to encourage COVID shots

Survey shows that confidence in vaccines has risen this spring

Port Alberni court house (Alberni Valley News)
Inquest set into 2016 death of B.C. teen after a day spent in police custody

18-year-old Jocelyn George died of heart failure in hospital after spending time in jail cell

Children’s shoes and flowers are shown after being placed outside the Ontario legislature in Toronto on Monday, May 31, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn
Ontario commits $10 million to investigate burial sites at residential schools

Truth and Reconciliation Commission identified 12 locations of unmarked burial sites in Ontario

Two hundred and fifteen lights are placed on the lawn outside the Residential School in Kamloops, B.C., Saturday, June, 13, 2021. The remains of 215 children were discovered buried near the former Kamloops Indian Residential School earlier this month. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Days after Kamloops remains discovery, Tk’emlups families gather to unite, move ahead

‘We have to work together because this is going to be setting a precedent for the rest of the country’

Most Read