Voting for change may hurt B.C.

I’m concerned that many British Columbians are more focused on “change” for the sake of change

I’m concerned that many British Columbians are more focused on “change” for the sake of change rather than electing the party most likely to foster job creation and financial stability.

Our province’s resource endowment has always been a mainstay of both jobs and the generation of revenues needed to fund social programs.

From what I have seen and heard, an NDP government would  rev up spending while stymieing resource development through endless environmental reviews and or by just saying “no,” driving investment to other provinces and other countries.

We need new mines and gas fields, pipelines, refineries, ports and processing plants to replace jobs lost by tech change and by events like the pine beetle catastrophe.

Economic development and the protection of the environment are not mutually exclusive. Yes, we must be good stewards of our beautiful province, but we do have the technology to move the economy forward in an environmentally responsible manner.

Saying no to new projects will mean job losses for the currently employed and no opportunity for young people looking to join the work force.

We also need to focus on balancing the provincial budget, rather than taking money away from social programs to fund rising interest costs. Forty years of experience in business has taught me that too much debt is crippling.

It scares me that the NDP have rolled out billions of dollars in new spending during this campaign, and their “every dollar is accounted for” rhetoric just isn’t credible because their anti-development attitude will reduce revenue at the same time as spending rises.

There is truth to the adage, “Those who fail to learn from history are doomed to repeat it.”

The NDP came to power in 1991 and governed the rest of that decade. Investment dried up and economic growth trailed the rest of Canada.

A low point came when the Edmonton Chamber of Commerce thanked the B.C. government for driving growth investment in Alberta.

Glenn Clark’s 1996-1999 tenure was arguably the most disastrous for B.C. and with Adrian Dix, Premier Clark’s former chief of staff leading the province, I’d be very worried about history repeating itself.

It took many years for the Liberals to repair the damage.  During their time in government, North America suffered through a major recession and yet we now have a triple-A credit rating, higher than the U.S. government, allowing B.C. taxpayers the lowest possible interest rates

Have the Liberals done everything right? Certainly not.

The introduction of the HST by the Campbell government was badly handled.

There have been other gaffes and ill-thought-out policies. And while there is a natural inclination for people to vote to change long governing parties, it’s important not to let the NDP sleepwalk to victory without thinking about which party is likely to create jobs and not burden today’s young people with a mountain of debt.

I’m not asking that you agree with me, only that you think through the full consequences of your choice carefully.

And then get out and vote on May 14.

-Gwyn Morgan is a retired businessman who lives in the Greater Victoria region. He is the former CEO of EnCana corporation and is a trustee with the Fraser Institute. He also served as an advisor for Premier Christy Clark.

 

Just Posted

Salmon Arm campus of Okanagan College to raise Secwepemcúl̓ecw flag

College to recognize campus sits on traditional and unceded territory

Survey: Salmon Arm houses cheaper to buy than many towns in B.C.

Only places with lower average price per square foot in study were northern communities

City’s only female firefighter feels at home with Salmon Arm crew

Apprentice machinist Kelsey Gorgichuk joined department to give back to community

Ogopogo and Shuswaggi aren’t the only lake monsters to have legendary status

While both have legend status in the Okanagan-Shuswap regions there are said to be more

Video: All ages rally in Salmon Arm to demand climate action

More than 150 people make their way from Ross Street Plaza to city hall for rousing speeches

Handgun crackdown, health spending and transit plans latest campaign promises

Friday was the end of a busy week on the campaign trail

One-in-five British Columbians think they’ll win big while gambling: study

Roughly 58 per cent of British Columbians bought at least one lottery ticket in past year

Okanagan hosts Mexico for soccer

The Okanagan Masters League won both matches against their Mexican counterparts

Epic overtime battle, big turnout for memorial night to late owner of Okanagan hockey team

The KIJHL’s Kelowna Chiefs hounoured Grant Sheridan with a win in the team’s home-opener

Takaya, B.C.’s infamous lone wolf, seen eating seal and howling away on Discovery Island

Fun facts about Takaya the wolf, like his a 36-hour tour around Chatham, Discovery Islands

Resident finds loaded shotgun inside a duffle bag in Kelowna alleyway

RCMP seized a loaded 12-gauge shotgun, ammunition, clothing and other items

Graffiti, calls and Snapchat: RCMP probe string of threats targeting Kamloops schools

There have been nine different threats made to four different schools in the city

Oak Bay father’s testimony at murder trial like plot of ‘bad low-budget movie:’ Crown

Crown alleged Andrew Berry’s ‘entire story of Christmas Day is a lie’

B.C. truck drivers to face higher fines for not using winter tire chains

As of Oct. 1, not using chains on the highway when required could net you a $598 ticket

Most Read