Environment

The Broombusters Invasive Plant Society wants the province to officially label the invasive species Scotch broom as a noxious weed. (File photo)

Group launches sweeping campaign for B.C. to label Scotch broom a noxious weed

Province also asked to help stop spread of the invasive plant species

The Broombusters Invasive Plant Society wants the province to officially label the invasive species Scotch broom as a noxious weed. (File photo)
The Campbell River Estuary Conservation Area. (Photo/Nature Conservancy of Canada).

Federal goal to conserve 25% of land by 2025 achievable – with work: advocate

Protecting land requires time and money, says B.C. Vice President of conservation organization

The Campbell River Estuary Conservation Area. (Photo/Nature Conservancy of Canada).
A large algal bloom lingered in Shuswap Lake near Salmon Arm for much of the summer of 2020. (Trevor Andrew photo)
A large algal bloom lingered in Shuswap Lake near Salmon Arm for much of the summer of 2020. (Trevor Andrew photo)
David Suzuki at Grizzly Plaza in Revelstoke on May 27. (Josh Piercey/Revelstoke Review)

Low-carbon adventure: David Suzuki journeys across Canada in electric vehicle

Suzuki, his wife Tara Cullis, and a film crew made a pit-stop in Revelstoke on May 27

David Suzuki at Grizzly Plaza in Revelstoke on May 27. (Josh Piercey/Revelstoke Review)
A fly fisherman casts on the Kootenai River, downstream of the Koocanusa Reservoir, near the Montana-Idaho boundary and Leonia, Idaho, on Sept. 19, 2014. The agency that mediates disputes between Canada and the U.S. over shared waters is pleading with the federal Liberals to join an investigation into contamination from British Columbia coal mines.THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP - The Spokesman Review, Rich Landers

International commission asks Canada to join probe of selenium flowing from B.C.

Ottawa has already rejected a similar request from the Ktunaxa First Nation

A fly fisherman casts on the Kootenai River, downstream of the Koocanusa Reservoir, near the Montana-Idaho boundary and Leonia, Idaho, on Sept. 19, 2014. The agency that mediates disputes between Canada and the U.S. over shared waters is pleading with the federal Liberals to join an investigation into contamination from British Columbia coal mines.THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP - The Spokesman Review, Rich Landers
Bioform’s Rami Younes (right) and Jordan MacKenzie (left) showing a sheet of the bioplastic. (Credit: Kai Jacobson/UBC Applied Science)

UBC scientists aim to put plastic in the past with 2 new inventions

Biodegradable product could replace plastic, unique coating could extend its life

Bioform’s Rami Younes (right) and Jordan MacKenzie (left) showing a sheet of the bioplastic. (Credit: Kai Jacobson/UBC Applied Science)
A sign opposing coal development in the eastern slopes of the Livingston range south west of Longview, Alta., Wednesday, June 16, 2021.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Alberta town endorses community-developed policy saying no to coal mining in Rockies

High River has joined 30 organizations in signing a document pushing prohibition of coal in Alberta

A sign opposing coal development in the eastern slopes of the Livingston range south west of Longview, Alta., Wednesday, June 16, 2021.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
By the year 2052, the North Shuswap community of Kwikoit, formerly known as Scotch Creek, is a thriving small city that includes many small, 
intensive farms. (Google Earth map graphic)
By the year 2052, the North Shuswap community of Kwikoit, formerly known as Scotch Creek, is a thriving small city that includes many small, 
intensive farms. (Google Earth map graphic)
The Sparks Lake wildfire shown on June 30, 2021. Beginning in 2022, the B.C. government will provide communities with at least $38,000 a year to fight climate change. (BC Wildfire Service photo)

B.C. communities to receive new annual climate action funding

Each to recieve at least $38,000 annually for next 3 years

The Sparks Lake wildfire shown on June 30, 2021. Beginning in 2022, the B.C. government will provide communities with at least $38,000 a year to fight climate change. (BC Wildfire Service photo)
The Ministry of Environment is monitoring a tractor-trailer unit that went off Highway 1 and into the Eagle River near the Enchanted Forest on May 5, 2022. (Ardel Sikora photo)

‘We just couldn’t believe it’: Shuswap truck driver outraged over crashed semi left in river

Ministry of Environment said heavy rain and rising water made removal unsafe

The Ministry of Environment is monitoring a tractor-trailer unit that went off Highway 1 and into the Eagle River near the Enchanted Forest on May 5, 2022. (Ardel Sikora photo)
Marine biologist Colin Foord, rear, and musician J.D. McKay work at their Coral Morphologic lab, Wednesday, March 2, 2022, in Miami. They have been on a 15-year mission to raise awareness about dying coral reefs with a company that presents the issue through science and art. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)

Coral reefs provide stunning images of a world under assault

Coral Morphologic shows real-world example of how coral communities can adapt at busy port of Miami

Marine biologist Colin Foord, rear, and musician J.D. McKay work at their Coral Morphologic lab, Wednesday, March 2, 2022, in Miami. They have been on a 15-year mission to raise awareness about dying coral reefs with a company that presents the issue through science and art. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
This 2021 image provided by LeighAnn Ferrara shows Ferrara’s young son as he watches a rabbit on a grassy patch of his White Plains, N.Y., yard, which is surrounded by planting beds of flowers, vegetables and trees. Many people are converting parts of their grass lawns into more diverse plantings. (LeighAnn Ferrara via AP

North America’s love affair with the lawn is getting messy

Some homeowners seeing a well-manicured lawn as an anachronism, even a threat

This 2021 image provided by LeighAnn Ferrara shows Ferrara’s young son as he watches a rabbit on a grassy patch of his White Plains, N.Y., yard, which is surrounded by planting beds of flowers, vegetables and trees. Many people are converting parts of their grass lawns into more diverse plantings. (LeighAnn Ferrara via AP
While some people may participate in No Mow May, the Nature Conservancy of Canada urges everyone to take the next step in naturalizing backyards or balconies. (Christine van Reeuwyk/News Staff)
While some people may participate in No Mow May, the Nature Conservancy of Canada urges everyone to take the next step in naturalizing backyards or balconies. (Christine van Reeuwyk/News Staff)
Don Davidson pictured at Pigeon Lake Alta, on Sunday May 1, 2022. 2022. Thousands of Alberta cottagers and homeowners are waiting nervously to see if a provincial regulator will allow a large feedlot to be developed near the popular and environmentally fragile recreational lake. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson

Proposed cattle feedlot threatens popular but fragile Alberta lake, residents say

G&S Cattle of Ponoka, Alta., wants to pen 4,000 cattle about four kilometres west of Pigeon Lake

Don Davidson pictured at Pigeon Lake Alta, on Sunday May 1, 2022. 2022. Thousands of Alberta cottagers and homeowners are waiting nervously to see if a provincial regulator will allow a large feedlot to be developed near the popular and environmentally fragile recreational lake. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson
A man walks in frigid weather at Rundle Park as emissions rise from the Imperial Oil Strathcona Refinery, in Edmonton, Wednesday, Dec. 25, 2019. The federal government is pushing legislation to enshrine the right to a healthy environment into law but is giving itself up to two more years to define what that means. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Feds enshrining right to healthy environment but no clarity on what that means

Government will have up to two years after bill takes effect to define that right’s implementation

A man walks in frigid weather at Rundle Park as emissions rise from the Imperial Oil Strathcona Refinery, in Edmonton, Wednesday, Dec. 25, 2019. The federal government is pushing legislation to enshrine the right to a healthy environment into law but is giving itself up to two more years to define what that means. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Ryan Cootes, Erin Bremner-Mitchell, Bill Collins and Mike Williamson of Cascadia Seaweed Corporation are here seen holding up seaweed grown in Barkley Sound in July 2020. The company will receive up to $533,475 to determine the potential of three types of seaweed as an alternative feedstock for cattle. (Cascadia Seaweed Corporation/Submitted)

B.C. company chewing on the possibilities of seaweed as cattle feed

Vancouver Island’s Cascadia Seaweed will receive up to $533,475 from federal government

Ryan Cootes, Erin Bremner-Mitchell, Bill Collins and Mike Williamson of Cascadia Seaweed Corporation are here seen holding up seaweed grown in Barkley Sound in July 2020. The company will receive up to $533,475 to determine the potential of three types of seaweed as an alternative feedstock for cattle. (Cascadia Seaweed Corporation/Submitted)
Old-growth logging protestor Howard Breen says he was taken to hospital Sunday (April 24), on the 24th day of his hunger strike. (Courtesy of Save Old Growth)

B.C. man says old-growth protests escalating after brief hospitalization

68-year-old Nanaimo resident was on day 24 of his hunger strike Sunday

Old-growth logging protestor Howard Breen says he was taken to hospital Sunday (April 24), on the 24th day of his hunger strike. (Courtesy of Save Old Growth)
Howard Breen, of Nanaimo, shown in this undated handout image, says he has been on a hunger strike for 23 days and won’t stop protesting against old-growth logging until B.C.’s forests minister agrees to a public meeting. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Save Old Growth **MANDATORY CREDIT**

B.C. man wanting public meeting has ‘death-watch monitors’ on Day 23 of hunger strike

68-year-old activist protesting the logging of old growth forests

Howard Breen, of Nanaimo, shown in this undated handout image, says he has been on a hunger strike for 23 days and won’t stop protesting against old-growth logging until B.C.’s forests minister agrees to a public meeting. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Save Old Growth **MANDATORY CREDIT**
This submitted photo shows Paul Cottrell, wearing the red jacket, helping to disentangle a humpback whale.

A first as the world warms: New forecasts could help predict marine heat waves

Multiple marine heat waves have occurred since 2014 along the Washington coast

This submitted photo shows Paul Cottrell, wearing the red jacket, helping to disentangle a humpback whale.
A video captured on the Ironworkers Memorial Bridge in Metro Vancouver Thursday (April 21) morning, shows angry drivers dragging old growth logging protestors, who were blocking their commute, out of the way. (Save Old Growth/Twitter)

‘You wanna die?’: Angry commuters drag ‘Save Old Growth’ protesters off B.C. highway

Video captured clash between drivers, protestors in Metro Vancouver April 21

A video captured on the Ironworkers Memorial Bridge in Metro Vancouver Thursday (April 21) morning, shows angry drivers dragging old growth logging protestors, who were blocking their commute, out of the way. (Save Old Growth/Twitter)