Fin de Fiesta Flamenco troupe brings their latest work, Salvaje, to the Shuswap Theatre stage on Sunday, July 29. (Photo contributed)

Fin de Fiesta Flamenco troupe brings their latest work, Salvaje, to the Shuswap Theatre stage on Sunday, July 29. (Photo contributed)

Exploring the wild and unrestrained side of flamenco

Fin de Fiesta Flamenco troupe returns to Salmon Arm with Salvaje

Fin de Fiesta Flamenco returns to Salmon Arm with a new production that explores the wild and unrestrained side of one of the world’s most passionate and intense art forms.

The dance and music ensemble will be at Shuswap Theatre on Sunday, July 29 to perform their latest work, Salvaje, or “wild,” a show that pays tribute to flamenco’s rough and tumble origins.

“Flamenco wasn’t born in a theatre, it was born in the streets,” says Fin de Fiesta artistic director and dancer Lia Grainger. “It was the music and dance of the people. In Spain, in many ways it still is.”

Accompanying Grainger on stage will be vocalist Alejandro Mendiam, Dennis Duffin on guitar, flautist Lara Wong and percussionist Hanser Santos Gomez. Though they come from France, Cuba and Canada, Fin de Fiesta’s core members all live in Spain, collaborating with and drawing inspiration from the world’s best flamenco singers, dancers and guitarists.

Related: Music ensemble explores global roots of flamenco

Joining Fin de Fiesta on their cross-Canada tour this year is dancer Deborah “La Caramelita.” She brings a wild and gypsy-influenced repertoire to the show, something audiences in Salmon Arm have not seen before with Fin de Fiesta.

“Raised in Canada to parents of Indian origin, Deborah moved to Spain at the age of 18 and never looked back. In the decade that has passed since she made the move, she has developed a truly spectacular style all her own, at once savage and refined,” says Grainger.

Flamenco in Spain draws from many cultural and historical influences, but the members of Fin de Fiesta often find themselves most drawn to the raw and improvisational “gitano” style that emerged 200 years ago from the gypsy culture of southern Spain.

“There are so many different styles of flamenco today,” says Grainger. “Many of the world’s top flamenco dancers are creating work that resembles contemporary or modern dance in many ways. With this show, we’re going in the opposite direction, back to the traditional, wild, emotive roots of flamenco.”

Fin de Fiesta’s Salmon Arm performance begins at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $25 at door or $22 in advance at Intwined Fabric Arts or online at findefiestaflamenco.com.


@SalmonArm
lachlan@saobserver.net

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