photo:contributed

The Tea Party lives on

The Canadian rock band will come to Kelowna in Spring

One of the great rock’n’roll bands to come out of Canada doesn’t plan on slowing down anytime soon.

The Tea Party was founded in 1990 and received seven of their 13 JUNO Award nominations between 1994 and 1988. The band has stayed together longer than their idols, Led Zeppelin and The Beatles.

Their unmistakable guitar riffs infused with middle eastern, celtic and mediterranean music sets them apart from the rest. Their willingness to stand out from the rest offered rewards and now the band is revered internationally.

As their career has continued, they have grown in popularity internationally. Becoming well known and in-demand in Australia and the U.S.

In the beginning of their career lead singer, Jeff Martin was constantly compared to the likes of the Doors’ frontman, Jim Morrison but they have forged their own path and cemented their mark on rock history.

“We have always stayed true to who we are, never followed trends even when everyone was either doing the grunge thing or doing nothing,” said drummer, Jeff Burrows.

The band took a break in 2005 but couldn’t quit each other and reunited in 2011.

“When we fell out and we were the complete opposite of that time — that was Canada rock’s heyday. None of it really had to do with the grunge scene. We always stayed true to our roots and realized we have always been very eclectic and we never pigeonholed ourselves to one sound,” said Burrows. “It’s strange now… listening to these new bands (that now) all sound like (the) stuff (we were) doing 30 years ago … they are right on track and we are just doing what we do.”

RELATED: Shakey Graves brings his musical evolution to the Okanagan Valley

When The Tea Party kicks off the Black River Tour, Dec. 27 in Toronto it will have been the longest time they haven’t toured together since their six-year hiatus.

“2020 will be our 30th anniversary when a band turns 30 years-old you really don’t have that perspective until say it out loud. Look at when Zeppelin started that they were done in 1980 and it’s crazy to look at things like The Beatles, did they play for 30 years? Nowhere near. So when you look at it that way to be appreciated on a national level like we are it’s an honour and we carry that weight knowing that we are very grateful for everything afforded us and keeps us going,” said Burrows.

The drummer says that their success stems from their inability to conform to trends, allowing them to be a band that almost 30 years later isn’t touring their hits but is still touring with new albums along with a few fan favourites thrown into the line-up.

RELATED: The Arkells bring Rally Cry to Kelowna

It was when the band played with the Sydney Youth Orchestra in Australia that Burrows had chills running down his spine. They performed Requiem, a song dedicated to their manager Steve Hoffman who died of cancer with the symphony and an opera singer wove her voice through the song to a full house in 2017.

“It was mind boggling, it’s something I am most grateful for, it’s those opportunities that you look around and say I don’t belong here. It’s unreal,” said Burrows.

The eclectic hard rock band will be stopping in Kelowna May 7 at the Kelowna Community Theatre. Tickets are available at selectyourtickets.com

To report a typo, email:
newstips@kelownacapnews.com
.


@sydneyrmorton
sydney.morton@kelownacapnews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

UPDATE: Two killed in collision, fire near Three Valley Gap

The Trans Canada Highway was closed for four hours

Chase rail blockade resumes after four-day truce

Protest held in solidarity with Wet’suwet’en First Nation regarding RCMP, LNG pipeline

Shuswap animal sanctuary seeks to fit frostbitten baby goat with prosthetic leg

Fundraiser started to help Zuri, newest resident of Twin Hearts Animal Sanctuary

Stanley Cup returning to Salmon Arm after 15 years

Resident excited for twice-in-a-lifetime opportunity to see iconic trophy

Money available to curtail nutrient pollution of Shuswap watershed

Excessive phosphorous could make algae blooms and other unpleasant conditions more common

Trout ‘doing quite well’ at Kootenay hatchery after otters, who ate 150 fish, relocated

River otters had been pillaging a moat outside the facility for months, gobbling up about 150 trout

VIDEO: Illicit drug overdoses killed 981 in B.C. in 2019, down 38%

Chief coroner says figures were down about a third in the province’s fourth year of the opioid crisis

Trudeau revisits blackface embarrassment during Black History Month

Photos and a video of Trudeau wearing makeup to darken his skin surfaced during last fall’s election campaign

Alleged racially-motivated vandalism concerns Penticton Chinese community

Chinese community worried fear surrounding COVID-19 coronavirus a cause for discrimination.

Kelowna mayor to request RCMP’s ‘unfounded’ sexual assault report

RCMP said the report was completed over a month ago but have yet to release it or make a statement

Criminality not suspected in Ellison trailer fire death

The body was discovered after crews responded to reports of a house fire

VIDEO: B.C.’s seventh coronavirus patient at home in Fraser Health region

Canada in ‘containment’ as COVID-19 spreads in other countries

Most Read