The collapse of the Morandi Bridge sent dozens of cars and three trucks plunging as much as 45 metres (150 feet) Tuesday. (Photo by THE ASSOCIATED PRESS)

Death toll hits 39 in Italy bridge collapse; blame begins

The collapse of the Morandi Bridge sent dozens of cars and three trucks plunging as much as 45 metres (150 feet) to the ground Tuesday.

Italian emergency workers pulled two more bodies out of tons of broken concrete and twisted steel Wednesday after a highway bridge collapsed in Genoa, raising the death toll in the disaster to at least 39 people.

The collapse of the Morandi Bridge sent dozens of cars and three trucks plunging as much as 45 metres (150 feet) to the ground Tuesday as many Italian families were on the road ahead of Wednesday’s major summer holiday. The collapse took place after a violent storm.

Civil protection chief Angelo Borrelli confirmed Wednesday that 39 people had died and 15 were injured. Interior Minister Matteo Salvini said three children were among the dead.

Working with heavy equipment, rescuers climbed over concrete slabs with sniffer dogs all through the night and into the day, searching for survivors or bodies. Borrelli said 1,000 of them were at the scene.

Investigators, meanwhile, were working to determine what caused an 80-meter (260-foot) long stretch of highway to break off from the 45-meter (150-foot) high bridge in the northwestern port city.

Italian politicians, for their part, were trying to find who to blame for the deadly tragedy.

The 1967 bridge, considered innovative in its time for its use of concrete around its cables, was long due for an upgrade, especially since the structure was more heavily trafficked than its designers had envisioned. One expert in such construction, Antonio Brencich at the University of Genoa, had previously called the bridge “a failure of engineering.”

An unidentified woman who was standing below the bridge told RAI state TV that it crumbled Tuesday as if it were a mound of baking flour.

Engineering experts, noting that the bridge was 51 years old, said corrosion and weather could have been factors in its collapse.

Related: Cars plunge in Italian highway bridge collapse

Related: Man plows truck into Houses of Parliament in London

The Italian CNR civil engineering society said structures dating from when the Morandi Bridge was built had surpassed their lifespan. It called for a “Marshall Plan” to repair or replace tens of thousands of Italian bridges and viaducts built in the 1950s and 1960s. It said that simply updating or reinforcing the bridges would be more expensive than destroying and rebuilding them with new technology.

Mehdi Kashani, an associate professor in structural mechanics at the University of Southampton in the U.K., said pressure from “dynamic loads,” such as heavy traffic or strong winds, could have resulted in “fatigue damage” in the bridge’s parts.

Italy’s minister of transportation and infrastructure, Danilo Toninelli, said there was a plan pending to spend 20 million euro ($22.7 million) on bids for significant safety work on the bridge.

While the collapse’s cause is yet to be determined, political bickering moved into high gear Wednesday.

Toninelli, from the populist 5-Star Movement, threatened in a Facebook post that the state, if necessary, would take direct control of the highway contractor responsible for the bridge if it couldn’t properly care for the roads and bridges it was responsible for.

State radio reported Wednesday that some 5-Star lawmakers in 2013 had questioned the wisdom of an ambitious, expensive infrastructure overhaul program as possibly wasteful, but that a post about that on the Movement’s site was removed Tuesday after the bridge’s collapse.

Within hours after the collapse, Salvini was trying to shift the blame away from Italy’s new populist government, vowing not to let European Union spending strictures on Italy, which is laden with public debt, stop any effort to make the country’s infrastructure safe.

Genoa is a flood-prone city, and officials were warning that the debris from the collapse must be removed as soon as possible. Some of the wreckage landed in a dry riverbed that could flood when the rainy season resumes in a few weeks.

At the Vatican, Pope Francis led prayers Wednesday for the victims of the Genoa bridge collapse.

Speaking to the faithful in St. Peter’s Square, Francis expressed his “spiritual closeness” to the victims, the injured and their families, and the hundreds of local people who were forced to evacuate their homes in the area.

___

D’Emilio reported from Rome. Simone Somekh in Rome and Danica Kirka in London contributed.

Paolo Santalucia And Frances D’Emilio, The Associated Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

 

Just Posted

North Okanagan-Shuswap MP surprised by Conservative leader’s resignation

Arnold predicts Conservative party will remain united in its quest to become government

Highway 1 now clear following vehicle accident

The accident occurred between Canoe Beach Dr NE and Bernie Rd

VIDEO: Your favourite Christmas light displays in the Shuswap

Residents recommend decorated homes worth checking out

‘A pretty big deal’: Salmon Arm prepares for the ultimate hockey fan experience

City awarded new hockey net/hoop by Rogers Hometown Hockey Tour

Disturbing find: Shuswap family seeking Christmas tree locates several animal carcasses

Black bear, a coyote and five deer found dumped in gravel pit west of Salmon Arm

‘Not a decision I came to lightly:’ Scheer to resign as Conservative leader

Decision comes after weeks of Conservative infighting following the October election

B.C. SPCA seizes dogs chained up outside among scrap metal, garbage

Shepherd-breed dogs were living in ‘deplorable conditions.’

B.C. plane crash victim identified; witnesses describe ‘explosion’

He was a flight instructor, charter pilot and owned an airstrip before leaving Alberta

BC Hydro offers tips as collisions with power poles increase

Region with the largest spike in collisions was the Lower Mainland at 16 per cent

Canadian airline passengers to be eligible for $1,000 in compensation for delayed flights

Passengers can also receive compensation for overbooking, lost luggage and other inconveniences

Okanagan air ambulance receives approval to use night vision in rescue situations

BCEHS says this will benefit critically-ill or injured patients who require transport late at night

Penticton’s Barley Mill, “naughty” Santa donate to SOS Medical Foundation

The brewery and local Santa raised $1,000 for the foundation on Dec. 7

All lifts open this weekend at SilverStar

Some terrain remains closed until more snow falls

Morning Start: Octopuses are brainier than you

Your morning start for Thursday, December 12, 2019

Most Read