Liberal Party, of Canada Leader Justin Trudeau, speaks to supporters as Marc Miller, MP of Ville-Marie-Le Sud-Ouest-Ile-des-Soeurs, looks on during an armchair discussion at an open Liberal Party fundraising event in Montreal, Quebec, Monday, June 17, 2019. (Peter McCabe/The Canadian Press via AP)

Liberal Party, of Canada Leader Justin Trudeau, speaks to supporters as Marc Miller, MP of Ville-Marie-Le Sud-Ouest-Ile-des-Soeurs, looks on during an armchair discussion at an open Liberal Party fundraising event in Montreal, Quebec, Monday, June 17, 2019. (Peter McCabe/The Canadian Press via AP)

Manitoba slams lack of detail on feds’ Indigenous child-welfare overhaul plan

The federal government has said the legislation will reduce the number of Indigenous children in care

Canada is only six weeks away from one of the largest-ever reforms to the Indigenous child-welfare system and Ottawa has not shared information about how it will be implemented or funded, Manitoba’s families minister says.

“This is not the way to bring about reforms in such an important area as this that will have an impact on the most vulnerable people in our society — which is our children,” Heather Stefanson said. “This is unacceptable.”

Stefanson said she shared her concerns with former Indigenous Services minister Seamus O’Regan last month about the rollout of C-92, which is to include a massive overhaul of Indigenous child-welfare across the country.

She said she never received a response.

Stefanson said she has sent another letter to newly appointed Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller this week reasserting the province’s concerns.

The federal government has said the legislation will reduce the number of Indigenous children in care by affirming the inherent rights of First Nation, Inuit and Metis communities.

Indigenous groups — which is not defined in the legislation — are to give notice of their intent to exercise jurisdiction or request a tripartite co-ordination agreement with the federal and provincial government. They would develop or implement existing laws related to child welfare and those would prevail over federal and provincial laws.

There is no funding attached to the legislation.

WATCH: Journalists launch ‘Spotlight: Child Welfare’ series into B.C.’s foster system

Rola Tfaili, a spokesperson for Indigenous Services Canada, said the department can’t provide specific information until the new year. Tfaili said the implementation will be co-developed with Indigenous partners and stakeholders.

Stefanson said she supports the overall objective of the legislation but said there’s no clear plans for how it will be implemented or funded.

In Manitoba, the stakes are high, she added. There are about 10,000 children in care in the province and about 90 per cent are Indigenous.

“We want to ensure these kids don’t fall through the cracks as a result of these changes that are being imposed by the federal government,” she said.

There are more than 60 First Nations in Manitoba. While many people live on reserves, a significant number live in urban centres.

There is also a large Metis population. Stefanson said the legislation needs to address situations where kids have connections to multiple communities.

She is concerned how it will affect data-sharing between agencies, such as the child-abuse registry, and ensure equity in care and work within the provincial court system.

Manitoba is currently doing its own child-welfare overhaul, and it will likely affect those plans, she said.

“This is arguably the biggest reform of child welfare in the history of our country and there’s been no dialogue.”

Stefanson said there are also questions about how it will affect the jurisdiction of the Manitoba Advocate for Children and Youth.

Advocate Daphne Penrose said there must be a clear plan on how to move from the current system to the new laws. She has not received any communication from the federal government.

“This is a system where children’s lives depend on this system protecting them in a number of areas, and supporting families to stay together,” she said, adding that people need to work together to make it a success.

“The federal government needs to provide communication and resources and funding and transitional frameworks in order for this to be done in a meaningful and good way for kids. Those commitments need to be in place.”

Kelly Geraldine Malone, The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

A concept rendering of the proposed seven-unit, two-storey development at 1129 Riverside Ave. in Sicamous. (District of Sicamous graphic)
Proposed luxury development in Sicamous sparks parking concerns

Seven-unit commercial-residential building planned for Riverside Avenue

The Shaw Centre and the SASCU Recreation Centre are the two largest producers of greenhouse gas emissions on City of Salmon Arm properties. (Martha Wickett-Salmon Arm Observer)
City of Salmon staff surprised COVID not cause of drop in greenhouse gas emissions

2020 sees emissions on city-owned properties decrease well below 2019 totals

Shuswap Litas and Son of Stomp head out from uptown Askew’s parking lot on Thursday, June 10, some with teddy bears and stuffies, to ride to Pierre’s Point by Adams Lake community hall to show their support for band members in the wake of the confirmation of 215 children buried at the site of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School. (Martha Wickett - Salmon Arm Observer)
Shuswap bike clubs ride to support Indigenous communities

Motorcyclists go to Pierre’s Point in solidarity with bands in wake of residential school findings

Interior Health is offering mobile vaccination clinics for the first dose only of COVID-19 vaccine in the Shuswap from June 15 to June 19h. (Interior Health image)
First-dose vaccinations for COVID-19 offered via mobile clinics in Shuswap

Clinic in Salmon Arm scheduled for June 15, other clinics in Sorrento, Malakwa, Chase

At an outdoor drive-in convocation ceremony, Mount Royal University bestows an honorary Doctor of Laws on Blackfoot Elder and residential school survivor Clarence Wolfleg in Calgary on Tuesday, June 8, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
‘You didn’t get the best of me’: Residential school survivor gets honorary doctorate

Clarence Wolfleg receives honorary doctorate from Mount Royal University, the highest honour the school gives out

18-year-old skier Logan Leach follows his guide, Julien Petit, down an alpine track. The Lumby athlete who is visually impaired has been named to Alpine Canada’s Ski Team ahead of the 2022 Paralympic Games in Beijing. (Contributed)
North Okanagan teen named to national Para-Alpine ski team

18-year-old Logan Leach officially joins Canada’s Para-Alpine roster ahead of Beijing 2022

Carina Stokes, bar manager at Enderby’s Small Axe Bistro, was recognized as one of four exceptional B.C. restaurant workers by the British Columbia Restaurant and Foodservices Association Tuesday, June 8, 2021. (Contributed)
Okanagan bar manager recognized as ‘stand-up’ B.C. restaurant worker

Small Axe Roadhouse’s Carina Stokes one of four to receive special recognition from the BCRFA

“They will never be forgotten, every child matters,” says Sioux Valley Chief Jennifer Bone in a video statement June 1. (Screen grab)
104 ‘potential graves’ detected at site of former residential school in Manitoba

Sioux Valley Dakota Nation working to identify, repatriate students buried near former Brandon residential school

The Queen Victoria statue at the B.C. legislature was splattered with what looks like red paint on Friday. (Nicole Crescenzi/News Staff)
Queen Victoria statue at B.C. legislature vandalized Friday

Statue splattered with red paint by old growth forest proponents

Police cars are seen parked outside Vancouver Police Department headquarters on Saturday, January 9, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Vancouver police officer charged with assault during an arrest in 2019

The service has released no other details about the allegations

Denmark’s Christian Eriksen receives medical attention after collapsing during the Euro 2020 soccer championship group B match between Denmark and Finland at Parken stadium in Copenhagen, Saturday, June 12, 2021. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner, Pool)
Christian Eriksen in stable condition, Euro 2020 match resumes

Eriksen was given chest compressions after collapsing on the field during a European Championship

Most Read