No set policy on flag lowering

If you’ve noticed the flags at city hall flying at half-mast, the reason likely has nothing to do with a local tragedy.

If you’ve noticed the flags at city hall flying at half-mast, the reason likely has nothing to do with a local tragedy.

The most recent lowering of the flags in July was in respect for the funeral service for Garde Gardom, the 26th Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia. Gardom died June 18 but his funeral was not held until July 17.

Carl Bannister, the city’s chief administrative officer, said the majority of time the flag-lowering is done at the request of the province – the city’s tenant in terms of the law courts – to mark events such as the death of prominent elected officials or noted British Columbians.

He said it is also done occasionally for other occurrences such as the death of Enderby firefighter, Dan Botkin, in December 2011, as well as RCMP issues of note.

Flags are also lowered at the Salmon Arm RCMP detachment whenever an RCMP  member is killed in the line of duty.

Bannister said the decision to lower the flags usually involves input from senior staff at city hall and sometimes the mayor.

Prior to the lowering of flags regarding Gardom’s funeral, they were lowered in April to recognize the international day of mourning to recognize worker deaths and injuries.

Last June both the Canadian and B.C. flags were lowered to recognize National Day of Remembrance for Victims of Terrorism. The Legislature in Victoria and all British Columbia government buildings and establishments across the province were recognizing the day.