The Pride Parade kicked off in Vancouver Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019. (Stephanie Smith/Twitter)

The Pride Parade kicked off in Vancouver Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019. (Stephanie Smith/Twitter)

Summer events, parades, large weddings off the table this summer: Henry

B.C.’s provincial health officer says this summer will not include large-scale events

This week, British Columbians’ ears peaked as health officials announced some of the current social contact restrictions set to curb COVID-19 could be eased by mid-May.

But for those still holding out that summer will include major events like the Pride parade or trips to the fair, B.C.’s provincial health officer says that won’t be happening.

“Realistically, we will not be having those big events where people gather together this summer,” Dr. Bonnie Henry said during a news conference on Saturday (April 18).

“That is a much riskier prospect than ever before. We do not have enough herd immunity or community immunity to protect everybody and allow that type of event to happen.”

Henry said this will likely be the case for any countries hit by the novel coronavirus.

ALSO READ: B.C. could see some COVID-19 restrictions eased by mid-May: Health officials

“This is a challenging time around our world and it’s not going to be easy for us to get out of it, but those those types of large, mass-gatherings where we have lots of people together, this is not the time for that.”

For those planning to get married this summer, Henry suggested reducing guest lists or trying to celebrate virtually. Funerals and other family gatherings where hugging and sharing food are typical are also risky.

“I know it’s really hard to think about having these events without getting together but we’ve found some really innovative ways of doing that,” Henry continued.

Since the province banned events larger than 50 attendees, many people have turned to elopements instead of postponing weddings, while others have celebrated birthdays and other milestones through online video calling.

It’s unclear if that ban will be lifted as the province looks to ease certain restrictions in the coming weeks and months. Health officials have cautioned that a certain level of physical distancing and other measures will be in place until there is a vaccine.

On Friday, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau told reporters that the federal government is planning for the traditional Canada Day celebration at Parliament Hill in Ottawa to be replaced with a virtual event, which will include Canadian artists.

Henry reiterated that steps taken now will allow for British Columbians to see normalcy in the future.

“The things we are doing right now are not forever.”


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Coronavirus

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

With bridge construction well underway on the project to replace the Solsqua-Sicamous bridge. Motorists should expect delays of up to half an hour. (Jim Elliot/Eagle Valley News)
Pedestrian path would connect Solsqua-Sicamous bridge to community

District of Sicamous staff say bridge replacement project on tight schedule

(Photo: Pixabay)
Enderby chamber proposes new rural e-business training program

The program would help rural-area businesses expand using online tools and insights

Signs in Homer, Alaska, offer inspiration during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Michael Armstrong-Homer News)
COLUMN: COVID-19 pandemic hits home

In Plain View by Lachlan Labere

Interior Health update. File photo.
86 new COVID-19 cases, two more deaths in Interior Health

The new deaths are from Heritage Square, a long-term care facility in Vernon

More than 20 days have passed since the last case of COVID-19 was confirmed at Lakeside Manor. (File photo)
Salmon Arm retirement facility reopens social areas after COVID-19

More than 20 days have passed since last confirmed case at Lakeside Manor

Keith the curious kitten is seen on Nov. 4, 2020 at the Chilliwack SPCA. Friday, Jan. 22, 2021 is Answer Your Cat’s Questions Day. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress file)
Unofficial holidays: Here’s what people are celebrating for the week of Jan. 17 to 23

Answer Your Cat’s Questions Day, Pie Day and International Sweatpants Day are all coming up this week

JaHyung Lee, “Canada’s oldest senior” at 110 years old, received his first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine on Thursday, Jan. 14, 2021. He lives at Amenida Seniors Community in Newton. (Submitted photo: Amenida Seniors Community)
A unique-looking deer has been visiting a Nanoose Bay property with its mother. (Frieda Van der Ree photo)
A deer with 3 ears? Unique animal routinely visits B.C. property

Experts say interesting look may be result of an injury rather than an odd birth defect

Sooke’s Jim Bottomley is among a handful of futurists based in Canada. “I want to help people understand the future of humanity.” (Aaron Guillen - Sooke News Mirror)
No crystal ball: B.C. man reveals how he makes his living predicting the future

63-year-old has worked analytical magic for politicians, car brands, and cosmetic companies

Terry David Mulligan. (Submitted photo)
Podcast: Interview with longtime actor/broadcaster and B.C. resident Terry David Mulligan

Podcast: Talk includes TDM’s RCMP career, radio, TV, wine, Janis Joplin and much more

Seasonal influenza vaccine is administered starting each fall in B.C. and around the world. (Langley Advance Times)
After 30,000 tests, influenza virually nowhere to be found in B.C.

COVID-19 precautions have eliminated seasonal infection

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau listens to a question during a news conference outside Rideau cottage in Ottawa, Friday, January 8, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Trudeau says Canada’s COVID vaccine plan on track despite Pfizer cutting back deliveries

Canadian officials say country will still likely receive four million doses by the end of March

Jobs Minister Ravi Kahlon shared a handwritten note his son received on Jan. 13, 2021. (Ravi Kahlon/Twitter)
Proud dad moment: B.C. minister’s son, 10, receives handwritten note for act of kindness

North Delta MLA took to Twitter to share a letter his son received from a new kid at school

Lilly and Poppy, two cats owned by Kalmar Cat Hotel ownder Donna Goodenough, both have cerebellAr hypoplasia, a genetic neurological condition that affects their ability to control their muscles and bones. Photo by Alistair Taylor – Campbell River Mirror
VIDEO: Wobbly Cats a riot of flailing legs and paws but bundles of love and joy to their owner

Woman urges others to not fear adopting cats with disabilities

Most Read