EDITORIAL: The quest to assign blame

Instead of sympathy, some have worked to distance themselves from these attacks or to assign blame.

A massacre at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand on Friday has left 50 people dead and many others injured.

Attacks such as these, targeting Muslim worshippers, are becoming far too common.

But some of the responses have been completely inappropriate. Instead of sympathy, some have worked either to distance themselves from these attacks or to point fingers and assign blame.

Soon after the attacks occurred, there were statements from New Zealand stating that the alleged shooter was an Australian, not a New Zealander.

RELATED: Mass shootings in New Zealand kill 49; 1 man charged

RELATED: Australian senator blames Muslims for mosque attack, faces censure

Later on Friday, Australian Sen. Fraser Anning blamed Muslim immigration for the tragedy.

“Does anyone still dispute the link between Muslim immigration and violence?” he stated in a tweet.

A lengthy manifesto written by the alleged shooter has detailed references to a far-right ideology and white supremacy.

Understanding this motivation is an important part in preventing similar attacks from happening in the future.

But some on the political right have stated that the actions of the shooter should not be seen as a representation of right-wing politics.

Rush Limbaugh, an American conservative commentator and talk show host, went even further.

In a broadcast on March 15—only hours after the massacre—Limbaugh speculated the shooter was someone from the political left, committing the horrible deeds in order to make his political opponents look bad.

“You can’t immediately discount this,” he said on his radio show. “The left is this insane. They are this crazy.”

Such speculation is not only implausible but also extremely cruel and insensitive, using a tragedy as a political positioning tool.

Assigning blame does nothing to explain why this tragedy happened, nor can it undo or alter the events which unfolded on Friday.

Being able to identify the shooter’s nationality or ethnic background or politics will not reduce the number who died or alleviate the grief their families and friends are experiencing, nor will it minimize the injuries of those who were wounded in the attacks.

It is understandable to feel sadness, shock, horror, revulsion, anger or confusion when massive acts of violence occur.

The quest to point fingers and place blame will benefit nobody.

— Summerland Review

To report a typo, email:
news@summerlandreview.com
.



news@summerlandreview.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

 

Just Posted

Salmon Arm’s sister city exchange with Inashiki, Japan marks 29 years

Activities galore for students from Inashiki and their hosts including a favourite, river rafting

Boil water notice issued for Scotch Creek/Lee Creek fire hall water system

Ongoing unacceptable coliform bacteria counts prompt CSRD to issue notice

Chief Atahm immersion school celebrates milestone expansion to Grade 10

New building to also provide language centre for creating Secwepemc learning resources

Pink Piston Paddlers dragon boat team powers to gold in Kamloops

Half of Shuswap-North Okanagan team are breast cancer survivors

Evacuation alert lifted for Shuswap residences following 2017 landslide

CSRD rescinds alert for four properties along Sunnybrae-Canoe Point Road

Osoyoos woman who threatened mom and baby with butcher knife sentenced

Sharon Constance Forner pleaded guilty to one criminal charge and was sentenced

Injured hiker rescued in Peachland

The woman fell while hiking Pincushion Mountain on Friday

‘Easy Rider’ star Peter Fonda dies at 79

Actor and writer was nominated for an Oscar for co-writing the 1969 psychedelic road trip movie

Roster turnover has Silverbacks head coach excited for coming season

Salmon Arm team announces all coaches returning to bench for 2019-20

Car of missing Victoria pair found in Vernon

RCMP encourage people to call with information, not just post on social media

Families receive support from ‘Living Flag’ fundraisers

A young man and a boy who both live with limited mobility were supported by the Canada Day events

Haida artist to perform at George Ryga Festival in Summerland

Interweavings features music from Terri-Lynn Williams-Davidson and Bill Henderson

Princeton hosts Western Canada’s only festival devoted exclusively to traditional music

From a Doukhobor choir to folk singers, singer songwriters, Celtic music and… Continue reading

Most Read