Future of post office facing threats

Times are changing, there’s no doubt. But adapting to change shouldn’t mean throwing out the baby with the bath water

Times are changing, there’s no doubt. But adapting to change shouldn’t mean throwing out the baby with the bath water.

A few decades ago, not many people envisioned themselves communicating via email, text message, Facebook or any of the other ways available to reach out at hyper speed.

Snail mail, as it has been dubbed, definitely no longer holds the place it once did in everyday life.  Canada Post reports it handles two million fewer letters a day countrywide than it once did. Clearly, it makes sense that the Crown corporation would make changes to adapt.

But some of these changes don’t make sense. At least not for the reasons we’ve been given.

Canada Post has been removing mail boxes because they’re under-utilized. Now, we’re told, any local mail destined for a local address that’s placed in a mail box will go to Vancouver for sorting, then will be transported back to Salmon Arm.

Apparently that’s the way it’s happening across the country. Centralization. Cost-savings.

If a resident wants their local mail that’s headed to a local address to be sorted locally, they must take it to the post office. Nowhere else.

In an era where shopping locally, 100-mile diets, sky-rocketing fuel prices, scarce resources and environmental devastation make up our current reality, is Canada Post serious?

Then there’s the Crown corporation’s interest in setting up a retail-style postal outlet half-a-kilometre from the current one.

Hmmm. It certainly sounds like that baby in the bath could have been the intended victim all along.