The Salmon Arm Art Gallery is currently hosting the Peak Year III exhibit, featuring pieces examining and reflecting upon the effects of climate change in B.C. On the exhibits opening night Sept. 14 the gallery invited people to come out, meet the artists, check out their work and enjoy some refreshments. (Jodi Brak/Salmon Arm Observer)

The Salmon Arm Art Gallery is currently hosting the Peak Year III exhibit, featuring pieces examining and reflecting upon the effects of climate change in B.C. On the exhibits opening night Sept. 14 the gallery invited people to come out, meet the artists, check out their work and enjoy some refreshments. (Jodi Brak/Salmon Arm Observer)

Salmon Arm Art Gallery hosts climate-focused exhibit

Peak Year III: A Climate of Change runs until Nov. 10

The Salmon Arm Art Gallery opened its latest exhibition, Peak Year III: A Climate of Change, Sept. 14 with a gallery reception.

Related: Shuswap artists explore impact of climate change on salmon

The exhibit features works from mixed-media artists including scultpure, visual art and animation examining the effects of climate change on the delicate ecosystem of the Adams River salmon run.

The exhibit runs until Nov. 10, Tuesday to Saturday at the Salmon Arm Art Gallery.


 

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Lottie Kozak’s piece, titled ‘Life and Death,’ is among many works on display in the Peak Year III exhibit. The description for this piece reads: “I’ve watched the animals in the forest for many years. I can see the change. I know bears. I see what is happening to them. They are weakened by this change. Not enough berries and not enough salmon makes too many hungry bears. Then it’s a problem.” (Jodi Brak/Salmon Arm Observer)

Lottie Kozak’s piece, titled ‘Life and Death,’ is among many works on display in the Peak Year III exhibit. The description for this piece reads: “I’ve watched the animals in the forest for many years. I can see the change. I know bears. I see what is happening to them. They are weakened by this change. Not enough berries and not enough salmon makes too many hungry bears. Then it’s a problem.” (Jodi Brak/Salmon Arm Observer)